„Our freedom is our own—civil and religious. We are so accustomed to it, as to the air we breathe, that we take it for granted…And that freedom did not drop down on us like the manna from Heaven: it has been fought for from the beginning of our history, and the blood of men far better than ourselves has been shed to obtain it. It is the result of centuries of resistance to the power of the executive, and it has brought us an equal justice and trial by jury, and freedom of worship, and freedom of opinion—religious and political.“

Broadcast from London (6 March 1934); published in This Torch of Freedom (1935), p. 17.
1934

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
Stanley Baldwin photo
Stanley Baldwin
Empresário, primo de Rudyard Kipling, foi por três vezes p… 1867 - 1947

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