„Right is not unlimited, but is limited by the laws.“

—  Ésquines, Ctesiphontem, 199.
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Ésquines
-389 - -314 a.C.
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„Laws with broad definitions of rape are like laws making 55 mile per hour speed limits for men and no speed limits for women.“

—  Warren Farrell, livro The Myth of Male Power
The Myth of Male Power (1993), Part III: Government as substitute husband, p. 317.

Thomas Jefferson photo

„All lawful authority, legislative, and executive, originates from the people. Power in the people is like light in the sun: native, original, inherent, and unlimited by anything human.“

—  James Burgh, Political Disquisitions
Political Disquisitions (1774), Context: All lawful authority, legislative, and executive, originates from the people. Power in the people is like light in the sun: native, original, inherent, and unlimited by anything human. In governors it may be compared to the reflected light of the moon, for it is only borrowed, delegated, and limited by the intention of the people; whose it is, and to whom governors are to consider themselves aa responsible, while the people are answerable only to God; — themselves being the losers, if they pursue a false scheme of politics.

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„In Australia there are not limits on what you can believe but there are limits on how you can behave. It's called the law, and no one is above it.“

—  Nick Xenophon Australian politician 1959
From 2009 November 17 speech on Scientology in Australia Senate, cited in [Natasha, Bita, http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/features/science-or-fiction/story-e6frg6z6-1225799903311, Science or fiction?, The Australian, November 20, 2009, 2009-11-20]

Kevin Kelly photo

„In the industrial economy success was self-limiting; it obeyed the law of decreasing returns.“

—  Kevin Kelly American author and editor 1952
Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines, Social Systems and the Economic World (1995), New Rules for the New Economy: 10 Radical Strategies for a Connected World (1999)

John Marshall photo

„The Government of the United States, then, though limited in its powers, is supreme, and its laws, when made in pursuance of the Constitution, form the supreme law of the land“

—  John Marshall fourth Chief Justice of the United States 1755 - 1835
McCulloch v. Maryland (1819), Context: [T]he Government of the Union, though limited in its powers, is supreme within its sphere of action. This would seem to result necessarily from its nature. It is the Government of all; its powers are delegated by all; it represents all, and acts for all. Though any one State may be willing to control its operations, no State is willing to allow others to control them. The nation, on those subjects on which it can act, must necessarily bind its component parts. But this question is not left to mere reason; the people have, in express terms, decided it by saying, [p406] "this Constitution, and the laws of the United States, which shall be made in pursuance thereof," "shall be the supreme law of the land," and by requiring that the members of the State legislatures and the officers of the executive and judicial departments of the States shall take the oath of fidelity to it. The Government of the United States, then, though limited in its powers, is supreme, and its laws, when made in pursuance of the Constitution, form the supreme law of the land, "anything in the Constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding." 17 U.S. (4 Wheaton) 316, 406-407

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„Beginners learned how to establish parallels, by means of the Game's symbols, between a piece of classical music and the formula for some law of nature. Experts and Masters of the Game freely wove the initial theme into unlimited combinations.“

—  Hermann Hesse, The Glass Bead Game
The Glass Bead Game (1943), Context: Under the shifting hegemony of now this, now that science or art, the Game of games had developed into a kind of universal language through which the players could express values and set these in relation to one another. Throughout its history the Game was closely allied with music, and usually proceeded according to musical and mathematical rules. One theme, two themes, or three themes were stated, elaborated, varied, and underwent a development quite similar to that of the theme in a Bach fugue or a concerto movement. A Game, for example, might start from a given astronomical configuration, or from the actual theme of a Bach fugue, or from a sentence out of Leibniz or the Upanishads, and from this theme, depending on the intentions and talents of the player, it could either further explore and elaborate the initial motif or else enrich its expressiveness by allusions to kindred concepts. Beginners learned how to establish parallels, by means of the Game's symbols, between a piece of classical music and the formula for some law of nature. Experts and Masters of the Game freely wove the initial theme into unlimited combinations.

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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“