„Those who claim to discover everything but produce no proofs of the same may be confuted as having actually pretended to discover the impossible.“

—  Arquímedes, livro On Spirals, On Spirals (225 B.C.)
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Arquímedes4
-287 - -212 a.C.
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Karl Mannheim photo
 Báb photo

„Should a person lay claim to a cause and produce his proofs, then those who seek to repudiate him are required to produce proofs like unto his.“

—  Báb Iranian prophet; founder of the religion Bábism; venerated in the Bahá'í Faith 1819 - 1850
The Kitáb-I-Asmá, Context: Should a person lay claim to a cause and produce his proofs, then those who seek to repudiate him are required to produce proofs like unto his. If they succeed in doing so, his words will prove vain and they will prevail; otherwise neither his words will cease nor the proofs he hath set forth will become void. I admonish you, O ye who are invested with the Bayán, if ye would fain assert your ascendancy, confront not any soul unless ye give proofs similar to that which he hath adduced; for Truth shall be firmly established, while aught else besides it is sure to perish. XVII, 11

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David Hume photo

„Nothing is more usual and more natural for those, who pretend to discover anything new to the world in philosophy and the sciences, than to insinuate the praises of their own systems, by decrying all those, which have been advanced before them.“

—  David Hume, A Treatise of Human Nature
A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-40), Context: Nothing is more usual and more natural for those, who pretend to discover anything new to the world in philosophy and the sciences, than to insinuate the praises of their own systems, by decrying all those, which have been advanced before them. And indeed were they content with lamenting that ignorance, which we still lie under in the most important questions, that can come before the tribunal of human reason, there are few, who have an acquaintance with the sciences, that would not readily agree with them. 'Tis easy for one of judgment and learning, to perceive the weak foundation even of those systems, which have obtained the greatest credit, and have carried their pretensions highest to accurate and profound reasoning. Principles taken upon trust, consequences lamely deduced from them, want of coherence in the parts, and of evidence in the whole, these are every where to be met with in the systems of the most eminent philosophers, and seem to have drawn disgrace upon philosophy itself. Introduction

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Camille Paglia photo

„Feminism’s claim that it discovered rape is simply false.“

—  Camille Paglia American writer 1947
Sex, Art and American Culture : New Essays (1992), The Rape Debate, Continued, p. 72

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Pierre de Fermat photo

„I have discovered a truly remarkable proof of this theorem which this margin is too small to contain.“

—  Pierre de Fermat French mathematician and lawyer 1601 - 1665
Cuius rei demonstrationem mirabilem sane detexi hanc marginis exiguitas non caperet. Note written on the margins of his copy of Claude-Gaspar Bachet's translation of the famous Arithmetica of Diophantus, this was taken as an indication of what became known as Fermat's last theorem, a correct proof for which would be found only 357 years later; as quoted in Number Theory in Science and Communication (1997) by Manfred Robert Schroeder

„Those who discover things for themselves and express them in their own way are not overly bothered by the fact that others have already discovered these things — have even discovered them over and over again — and have expressed what they found in all manner of ways.“

—  Eric Hoffer American philosopher 1902 - 1983
Context: Total innovation is a flight from comparison and also from imitation. Those who discover things for themselves and express them in their own way are not overly bothered by the fact that others have already discovered these things — have even discovered them over and over again — and have expressed what they found in all manner of ways. Entry (1960)

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Francis Bacon photo

„Another argument of hope may be drawn from this — that some of the inventions already known are such as before they were discovered it could hardly have entered any man's head to think of; they would have been simply set aside as impossible.“

—  Francis Bacon, livro Novum Organum
Novum Organum (1620), Book I, Context: Another argument of hope may be drawn from this — that some of the inventions already known are such as before they were discovered it could hardly have entered any man's head to think of; they would have been simply set aside as impossible. For in conjecturing what may be men set before them the example of what has been, and divine of the new with an imagination preoccupied and colored by the old; which way of forming opinions is very fallacious, for streams that are drawn from the springheads of nature do not always run in the old channels. Aphorism 109

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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“