„I claim the right not to incriminate myself.“

—  Ferdinando Marcos, At a press conference with government lawyers, Hawaii, when questioned about invoking the 5th amendment repeatedly, 1987
Ferdinando Marcos photo
Ferdinando Marcos
1917 - 1989
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Carl Zuckmayer photo
Clarence Thomas photo

„[I claim] my right to think for myself, to refuse to have my ideas assigned to me as though I was an intellectual slave because I'm black.“

—  Clarence Thomas Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States 1948
Reported in Ellis Cose, " Justice: Still Keeping Score http://web.archive.org/web/20070605123712/http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18248548/site/newsweek/page/2/", Newsweek (April 30, 2007).

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Alfred Hitchcock photo
Pat Paulsen photo

„I do not claim that I can solve all the world's problems by myself. If I did, I'd have to run as a Republican or a Democrat.“

—  Pat Paulsen United States Marine 1927 - 1997
Unidentified dinner, 1968 Featured in Pat Paulsen for President (1968), part 6 of 6 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ntOuehGE_D8&feature=relmfu, 02:32 ff (47:32 ff in full program)

Ward Cunningham photo
Adrienne Rich photo
Julian of Norwich photo

„For if I look singularly to myself, I am right nought;“

—  Julian of Norwich English theologian and anchoress 1342 - 1416
Context: Because of the Shewing I am not good but if I love God the better: and in as much as ye love God the better, it is more to you than to me. I say not this to them that be wise, for they wot it well; but I say it to you that be simple, for ease and comfort: for we are all one in comfort. For truly it was not shewed me that God loved me better than the least soul that is in grace; for I am certain that there be many that never had Shewing nor sight but of the common teaching of Holy Church, that love God better than I. For if I look singularly to myself, I am right nought; but in general I am, I hope, in oneness of charity with all mine even-Christians.

Max Stirner photo
Chief Joseph photo

„I claim a right to live on my land and accord you the privilege to return to yours.“

—  Chief Joseph Nez Percé Chieftain 1840 - 1904
Context: Perhaps you think the Creator sent you here to dispose of us as you see fit. If I thought you were sent by the Creator, I might be induced to think you had a right to dispose of me. Do not misunderstand me, but understand fully with reference to my affection for the land. I never said the land was mine to do with as I choose. The one who has a right to dispose of it is the one who has created it. I claim a right to live on my land and accord you the privilege to return to yours. Speech rejecting the demands that he lead his people onto a reservation. (1876)

Lawrence Lessig photo

„I believe it would be right for common sense to revolt against the extreme claims made today on behalf of "intellectual property."“

—  Lawrence Lessig American academic, political activist. 1961
Context: I believe it would be right for common sense to revolt against the extreme claims made today on behalf of "intellectual property." What the law demands today is increasingly as silly as a sheriff arresting an airplane for trespass. But the consequences of this silliness will be much more profound. Introduction

Robert G. Ingersoll photo

„I simply claim that what ideas I have, I have a right to express; and that any man who denies that right to me is an intellectual thief and robber. That is all.“

—  Robert G. Ingersoll Union United States Army officer 1833 - 1899
Context: Standing in the presence of the Unknown, all have the same right to think, and all are equally interested in the great questions of origin and destiny. All I claim, all I plead for, is liberty of thought and expression. That is all. I do not pretend to tell what is absolutely true, but what I think is true. I do not pretend to tell all the truth. I do not claim that I have floated level with the heights of thought, or that I have descended to the very depths of things. I simply claim that what ideas I have, I have a right to express; and that any man who denies that right to me is an intellectual thief and robber. That is all.

Karl Popper photo

„We should therefore claim, in the name of tolerance, the right not to tolerate the intolerant.“

—  Karl Popper Austrian-British philosopher of science 1902 - 1994
Context: The so-called paradox of freedom is the argument that freedom in the sense of absence of any constraining control must lead to very great restraint, since it makes the bully free to enslave the meek. The idea is, in a slightly different form, and with very different tendency, clearly expressed in Plato. Less well known is the paradox of tolerance: Unlimited tolerance must lead to the disappearance of tolerance. If we extend unlimited tolerance even to those who are intolerant, if we are not prepared to defend a tolerant society against the onslaught of the intolerant, then the tolerant will be destroyed, and tolerance with them. — In this formulation, I do not imply, for instance, that we should always suppress the utterance of intolerant philosophies; as long as we can counter them by rational argument and keep them in check by public opinion, suppression would certainly be unwise. But we should claim the right to suppress them if necessary even by force; for it may easily turn out that they are not prepared to meet us on the level of rational argument, but begin by denouncing all argument; they may forbid their followers to listen to rational argument, because it is deceptive, and teach them to answer arguments by the use of their fists or pistols. We should therefore claim, in the name of tolerance, the right not to tolerate the intolerant. We should claim that any movement preaching intolerance places itself outside the law, and we should consider incitement to intolerance and persecution as criminal, in the same way as we should consider incitement to murder, or to kidnapping, or to the revival of the slave trade, as criminal. Vol. 1, Notes to the Chapters: Ch. 7, Note 4

Robert G. Ingersoll photo

„Give to every human being every right that you claim for yourself.“

—  Robert G. Ingersoll, The Liberty of Man, Woman and Child
"The Limitations of Toleration" (8 May 1888), in The Works of Robert G. Ingersoll, Vol VII

Johann Gottlieb Fichte photo