„Is he not sacred, even to the gods, the wandering man who comes in weariness?“

—  Homero
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„And now deep in his weary heart
Are sacred flames that whitely burn.
He has of Heaven's grace a part
Who loves, who is beloved in turn.“

— Joyce Kilmer American poet, editor, literary critic, soldier 1886 - 1918
Context: For, once he thrilled with high romance And tuned to love his eager voice. Like any cavalier of France He wooed the maiden of his choice. And now deep in his weary heart Are sacred flames that whitely burn. He has of Heaven's grace a part Who loves, who is beloved in turn.

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„The Epistle to the Romans is a revelation of the unknown God; God chooses to come to man, not man to God. Even after the revelation man cannot know God, for he is ever the unknown God.“

— Karl Barth Swiss Protestant theologian 1886 - 1968
Context: We know that God is He whom we do not know, and that our ignorance is precisely the problem and the source of our knowledge. The Epistle to the Romans is a revelation of the unknown God; God chooses to come to man, not man to God. Even after the revelation man cannot know God, for he is ever the unknown God. In manifesting himself to man he is farther away than before. <!-- p. 48

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„Come, come, whoever you are.
Wanderer, worshipper, lover of leaving — it doesn't matter,
Ours is not a caravan of despair.
Come, even if you have broken your vow a hundred times,
Come, come again, come.“

—  Rumi Iranian poet 1207 - 1273
As quoted in Sunbeams : A Book of Quotations (1990) by Sy Safransky, p. 67 Variant translations: Come, come, whoever you are. Wanderer, idolator, worshipper of fire, come even though you have broken your vows a thousand times, Come, and come yet again. Ours is not a caravan of despair. As quoted in Muslim Narratives and the Discourse of English (2004) by Amin Malak, p. 151 Come, come, whoever you are. Wanderer, worshipper, lover of living, it doesn't matter Ours is not a caravan of despair. Come even if you have broken your vow a thousand times, Come, yet again, come, come. As quoted in Rumi and His Sufi Path of Love (2007) by M Fatih Citlak and Huseyin Bingul, p. 81 Come, come again, whoever you are, come! Heathen, fire worshipper or idolatrous, come! Come even if you broke your penitence a hundred times, Ours is the portal of hope, come as you are. As quoted in Turkey: A Primary Source Cultural Guide (2004) by Martha Kneib This poem is wrongly considered to be Rumi's work, where it is actually from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ab%C5%AB-Sa%27%C4%ABd_Abul-KhayrAbū-Sa'īd Abul-Khayr. The original poem in Farsi is باز آ باز آ هر آنچه هستی باز آ گر کافر و گبر و بت‌پرستی باز آ این درگه ما درگه نومیدی نیست صد بار اگر توبه شکستی باز آ http://ganjoor.net/abusaeed/robaee-aa/sh1/

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