„You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you can not fool all of the people all of the time.“

This is probably the most famous of apparently apocryphal remarks attributed to Lincoln. Despite it being cited variously as from an 1856 speech, or a September 1858 speech in Clinton, Illinois, there are no known contemporary records or accounts substantiating that he ever made the statement. The earliest known appearance is October 29, 1886 in the Milwaukee Daily Journal http://anotherhistoryblog.blogspot.com/2009/02/fooling-people-earlier.html. It later appeared in the New York Times on August 26 http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F30817FF3E5413738DDDAF0A94D0405B8784F0D3 and August 27 http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F00E15FF3E5413738DDDAE0A94D0405B8784F0D3, 1887. The saying was repeated several times in newspaper editorials later in 1887. In 1888 and, especially, 1889, the saying became commonplace, used in speeches, advertisements, and on portraits of Lincoln. In 1905 and later, there were attempts to find contemporaries of Lincoln who could recall Lincoln saying this. Historians have not, generally, found these accounts convincing. For more information see two articles in For the People: A Newsletter of the Abraham Lincoln Association, "'You Can Fool All of the People' Lincoln Never Said That", by Thomas F. Schwartz ( V. 5, #4, Winter 2003, p. 1 http://abrahamlincolnassociation.org/Newsletters/5-4.pdf) and "A New Look at 'You Can Fool All of the People'" by David B. Parker ( V. 7, #3, Autumn 2005, p. 1 http://abrahamlincolnassociation.org/Newsletters/7-3.pdf); also the talk page. The statement has also sometimes been attributed to P. T. Barnum, although no references to this have been found from the nineteenth century.
Variants:
You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all of the time, but you cannot fool all of the people all of the time.
You can fool all of the people some of the time, and some of the people all of the time, but you can't fool all of the people all of the time.
You can fool all the people some time, you can fool some of the people all of the time, but you can not fool all the people all the time.
Disputed

Abraham Lincoln photo
Abraham Lincoln104
16° Presidente dos Estados Unidos 1809 - 1865

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Bob Marley photo
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James Thurber photo

„You can fool too many of the people too much of the time.“

—  James Thurber American cartoonist, author, journalist, playwright 1894 - 1961

"The Owl who was God", The New Yorker (29 April 1939); Fables for Our Time & Famous Poems Illustrated (1940). Parody of "You can fool all the people some of the time and some of the people all of the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time."
From Fables for Our Time and Further Fables for Our Time

Will Cuppy photo

„Philip [II of Spain] was a great believer in diplomacy, or the art of lying. He fooled some of the people some of the time.“

—  Will Cuppy American writer 1884 - 1949

The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody (1950), Part III: Strange Bedfellows, Philip the Sap

Bram van Velde photo
Peace Pilgrim photo

„One little person, giving all of her time to peace, makes news. Many people, giving some of their time, can make history.“

—  Peace Pilgrim American non-denominational spiritual teacher 1908 - 1981

Ch. 8 : The Way of Peace
Contexto: Knowing that all things contrary to God's laws are transient, let us avoid despair and radiate hope for a warless world. Peace is possible, for thoughts have tremendous power.
A few really dedicated people can offset the ill effects of masses of out-of-harmony people, so we who work for peace must not falter. We must continue to pray for peace and to act for peace in whatever way we can, we must continue to speak for peace and to live the way of peace; to inspire others, we must continue to think of peace and to know that peace is possible. What we dwell upon we help to bring into manifestation. One little person, giving all of her time to peace, makes news. Many people, giving some of their time, can make history.

John Wesley photo

„Do all the good you can,
By all the means you can,
In all the ways you can,
In all the places you can,
At all the times you can,
To all the people you can,
As long as you ever can.“

—  John Wesley Christian theologian 1703 - 1791

Variant Do all the good you can, in all the ways you can, to all the souls you can, in every place you can, at all the times you can, with all the zeal you can, as long as ever you can.
In the sermon titled "The Use of Money" Wesley said, "Employ whatever God has entrusted you with in doing good, all possible good, in every possible kind and degree . . . to all men." This sermon is in the collection titled "Wesley's Standard Sermons." They are called "standard" because all Methodist preachers were instructed to read them and use them in interpreting the Christian faith.
Disputed
Variante: Do all the good you can. By all the means you can. In all the ways you can. In all the places you can. At all the times you can. To all the people you can. As long as ever you can.
Fonte: According to Richard Heitzenrater, Professor of Church History and Wesleyan Studies at Duke Divinity School, there is no evidence that John Wesley ever wrote the rule that is attributed to him.

Rita Mae Brown photo
Louis-ferdinand Céline photo
Dick Cavett photo

„You can, after all, reduce the reasons for watching TV to but two: to be lulled, and to be stimulated. Some people do one sometimes, the other sometimes. Some people do all of one or all of the other.“

—  Dick Cavett American talk show host 1936

Cavett http://books.google.com/books?id=CE4NAQAAMAAJ&q=%22You+can+after+all+reduce+the+reasons+for+watching+TV+to+but+two+to+be+lulled+and+to+be+stimulated+Some+people+do+one+sometimes+the+other+sometimes+Some+people+do+all+of+one+or+all+of+the+other%22&pg=PA331#v=onepage, co-authored with Christopher Porterfield (1974)
Excerpted in New York magazine July 22, 1974 http://books.google.com/books?id=kekCAAAAMBAJ&q=%22You+can+after+all+reduce+the+reasons+for+watching+TV+to%22+%22two+to+be+lulled+and+to+be+stimulated+Some+people+do+one+sometimes+the+other+sometimes+Some+people+do+all+of+one+or+all+of+the+other%22&pg=PA34#v=onepage

Benito Mussolini photo

„The best blood will at some time get into a fool or a mosquito.“

—  Benito Mussolini Duce and President of the Council of Ministers of Italy. Leader of the National Fascist Party and subsequent Republican… 1883 - 1945

Austin O'Malley, in Keystones of Thought (1914), p. 27
Attributed

George Carlin photo

„Some people see things that are and ask, Why?
Some people dream of things that never were and ask, Why not?
Some people have to go to work and don't have time for all that.“

—  George Carlin American stand-up comedian 1937 - 2008

Cf. Bernard Shaw, Back to Methuselah (1921), Pt. I : In the Beginning: I hear you say "Why?" Always "Why?" You see things; and you say "Why?" But I dream things that never were; and I say "Why not?"
Books, Brain Droppings (1997)
Variante: Some people dream of things that never were and ask, Why not? Some people have to go to work and don't have time for all that shit.

John Barrowman photo

„You can be in the public eye all the time and still have a private life, but the important thing is to keep in touch with the people who put you there.“

—  John Barrowman Scottish-American actor, singer, dancer, musical theatre performer, writer and television personality 1967

Why Torchwood star and talent show judge John Barrowman would do anything for success, Michael Hellicar, 2008-04-11, 2008-04-11, dailymail http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/showbiz/showbiznews.html?in_article_id=558746&in_page_id=1773,

Abraham Lincoln photo

„Tis better people think you a fool, then open your mouth and erase all doubt.“

—  Abraham Lincoln 16th President of the United States 1809 - 1865

Variously attributed to Lincoln, Elbert Hubbard, Mark Twain, Benjamin Franklin and Socrates
Misattributed
Variante: It is better to be silent and be thought a fool than to speak and remove all doubt.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“