„We live in a society absolutely dependent on science and technology and yet have cleverly arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. That's a clear prescription for disaster.“

—  Carl Sagan

Bringing Science Down to Earth (1994), co-authored with Anne Kalosh, in Hemispheres (October 1994), p. 99 http://books.google.com/books?id=gJ1rDj2nR3EC&lpg=PA99&pg=PA99; this is similar to statements either mentioned in earlier interviews or published later in the book The Demon-Haunted World : Science as a Candle in the Dark (1995)
Variants:
We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology.
"Why We Need To Understand Science" in The Skeptical Inquirer Vol. 14, Issue 3 (Spring 1990) http://www.csicop.org/si/show/why_we_need_to_understand_science
Not explaining science seems to me perverse. When you're in love, you want to tell the world.
"With Science on Our Side" https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/entertainment/books/1994/01/09/with-science-on-our-side/9e5d2141-9d53-4b4b-aa0f-7a6a0faff845/, Washington Post (9 January 1994)
We’ve arranged a society based on science and technology, in which nobody understands anything about science and technology. And this combustible mixture of ignorance and power, sooner or later, is going to blow up in our faces. Who is running the science and technology in a democracy if the people don’t know anything about it?
Charlie Rose: An Interview with Carl Sagan http://www.charlierose.com/guest/view/4553, May 27, 1996.
I know that science and technology are not just cornucopias pouring good deeds out into the world. Scientists not only conceived nuclear weapons; they also took political leaders by the lapels, arguing that their nation — whichever it happened to be — had to have one first. … There’s a reason people are nervous about science and technology.
And so the image of the mad scientist haunts our world—from Dr. Faust to Dr. Frankenstein to Dr. Strangelove to the white-coated loonies of Saturday morning children’s television. (All this doesn’t inspire budding scientists.) But there’s no way back. We can’t just conclude that science puts too much power into the hands of morally feeble technologists or corrupt, power-crazed politicians and decide to get rid of it. Advances in medicine and agriculture have saved more lives than have been lost in all the wars in history. Advances in transportation, communication, and entertainment have transformed the world. The sword of science is double-edged. Rather, its awesome power forces on all of us, including politicians, a new responsibility — more attention to the long-term consequences of technology, a global and transgenerational perspective, an incentive to avoid easy appeals to nationalism and chauvinism. Mistakes are becoming too expensive.
"Why We Need To Understand Science" in The Skeptical Inquirer Vol. 14, Issue 3 (Spring 1990)
Science is much more than a body of knowledge. It is a way of thinking. This is central to its success. Science invites us to let the facts in, even when they don’t conform to our preconceptions. It counsels us to carry alternative hypotheses in our heads and see which ones best match the facts. It urges on us a fine balance between no-holds-barred openness to new ideas, however heretical, and the most rigorous skeptical scrutiny of everything — new ideas and established wisdom. We need wide appreciation of this kind of thinking. It works. It’s an essential tool for a democracy in an age of change. Our task is not just to train more scientists but also to deepen public understanding of science.
"Why We Need To Understand Science" in The Skeptical Inquirer Vol. 14, Issue 3 (Spring 1990)
Science is [...] a way of skeptically interrogating the universe with a fine understanding of human fallibility. If we are not able to ask skeptical questions, to interrogate those who tell us that something is true, to be skeptical of those in authority, then we’re up for grabs for the next charlatan, political or religious, who comes ambling along.
Charlie Rose: An Interview with Carl Sagan http://www.charlierose.com/guest/view/4553 (27 May 1996)

Carl Sagan photo
Carl Sagan51
grande cientista do séc XX, criador da aclamada série Cosmo… 1934 - 1996

Citações relacionadas

Carl Sagan photo

„We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology.“

—  Carl Sagan American astrophysicist, cosmologist, author and science educator 1934 - 1996

"Why We Need To Understand Science" in The Skeptical Inquirer Vol. 14, Issue 3 (Spring 1990) http://www.csicop.org/si/show/why_we_need_to_understand_science

Margaret Mead photo
Lewis M. Branscomb photo

„Science has been the absolute bedrock of technological and economic progress in the United States.“

—  Lewis M. Branscomb physicist and science policy advisor 1926

Branscomb (2012) in: " Scientist Lewis M. Branscomb Gives $1 Million Gift to Found New Center for Science and Democracy at UCS http://www.ucsusa.org/news/press_release/scientist-lewis-branscomb-center-science-democracy-ucs-1385.html" at ucsusa.org/news, April 30, 2012

Vikram Sarabhai photo

„The development of the nation is intimately linked with understanding and application of science and technology by its people.“

—  Vikram Sarabhai (1919-1971), Indian physicist 1919 - 1971

Quoted in "Vikram A. Sarabhai".
Fonte: [The Tenth Dr. Vikram A. Sarabhai Festival of Performing Arts, https://www.prl.res.in/~library/sarabhai_v_quotes.pdf, PRL.res.in, 12 September 2019, https://web.archive.org/web/20190627192004/https://www.prl.res.in/~library/sarabhai_v_quotes.pdf, 12 September 2019, 28]

„At the heart of the matter… our technologies have become more powerful than our theories… We can do with technology what we cannot do with science.“

—  Paul Cilliers South African philosopher 1956 - 2011

Fonte: Complexity and Postmodernism (1998), p. 1-2; as cited by David Byrne (1999) in: " Complexity and Postmodernism: Book Review http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/2/2/review1.html" in JASSS Vol 2 (2)

Bono photo

„Be honest. We have the science, the technology, and the wealth. What we don't have is the will, and that's not a reason that history will accept.“

—  Bono Irish rock musician, singer of U2 1960

In an interview to the World Association of Newspapers for World Press Freedom Day (3 May 2004)
Contexto: It's an amazing thing to think that ours is the first generation in history that really can end extreme poverty, the kind that means a child dies for lack of food in its belly. That should be seen as the most incredible, historic opportunity but instead it's become a millstone around our necks. We let our own pathetic excuses about how it's "difficult" justify our own inaction. Be honest. We have the science, the technology, and the wealth. What we don't have is the will, and that's not a reason that history will accept.

Donald A. Norman photo

„People Propose, Science Studies, Technology Conforms.“

—  Donald A. Norman American academic 1935

Things That Make Us Smart (1993), Epilogue.

Czeslaw Milosz photo
Carl Djerassi photo

„The list was heavily skewed in favor of science and technology. …“

—  Carl Djerassi American chemistry professor, inventor, author, playwright 1923 - 2015

Edward O. Wilson photo
Bill Nye photo

„I will assert that U. S. economic growth is in lockstep with science and technology and, by extension, science education.“

—  Bill Nye American science educator, comedian, television host, actor, writer, scientist and former mechanical engineer 1955

[NewsBank, J.D. Velasco, Study: California's elementary schools barely teach science, The Whittier Daily News, California, October 25, 2011]

Richard Dawkins photo
John Lanchester photo

„Soap prevented more deaths than penicillin. That’s technology, not science.“

—  John Lanchester British writer 1962

The Case Against Civilization https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/09/18/the-case-against-civilization (September 18, 2017), The New Yorker.

Arthur C. Clarke photo

„Magic's just science that we don't understand yet.“

—  Arthur C. Clarke British science fiction writer, science writer, inventor, undersea explorer, and television series host 1917 - 2008

Hu Jintao photo
C.G. Jung photo

„Coming generations will have to take account of this momentous transformation if humanity is not to destroy itself through the might of its own technology and science.“

—  C.G. Jung Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist who founded analytical psychology 1875 - 1961

p 110
The Undiscovered Self (1958)
Contexto: We are living in what the Greeks called the right time for a "metamorphosis of the gods," i. e. of the fundamental principles and symbols. This peculiarity of our time, which is certainly not of our conscious choosing, is the expression of the unconscious man within us who is changing. Coming generations will have to take account of this momentous transformation if humanity is not to destroy itself through the might of its own technology and science.

David Fleming photo
Satoru Iwata photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“