„We two have paddled in the stream,
from morning sun till dine;
But seas between us broad have roared
since days of long ago.“

Robert Burns photo
Robert Burns
1759 - 1796
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T.S. Eliot photo

„We have lingered in the chambers of the sea
By sea-girls wreathed with seaweed red and brown
Till human voices wake us, and we drown.“

—  T.S. Eliot, The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock and Other Poems
The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock (1915), Context: I grow old … I grow old... I shall wear the bottoms of my trousers rolled. Shall I part my hair behind? Do I dare to eat a peach? I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each. I do not think that they will sing to me. I have seen them riding seaward on the waves Combing the white hair of the waves blown back When the wind blows the water white and black. We have lingered in the chambers of the sea By sea-girls wreathed with seaweed red and brown Till human voices wake us, and we drown.

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Johannes Kepler photo

„Now because 18 months ago the first dawn, 3 months ago broad daylight but a very few days ago the full sun of the most highly remarkable spectacle has risen — nothing holds me back.“

—  Johannes Kepler, Harmonices Mundi
Harmonices Mundi (1618), Context: Now because 18 months ago the first dawn, 3 months ago broad daylight but a very few days ago the full sun of the most highly remarkable spectacle has risen — nothing holds me back. I can give myself up to the sacred frenzy, I can have the insolence to make a full confession to mortal men that I have stolen the golden vessel of the Egyptians to make from them a tabernacle for my God far from the confines of the land of Egypt. If you forgive me I shall rejoice; if you are angry, I shall bear it; I am indeed casting the die and writing the book, either for my contemporaries or for posterity to read, it matters not which: let the book await its reader for a hundred years; God himself has waited six thousand years for his work to be seen. Book V, Introduction Variant translation: It may well wait a century for a reader, as God has waited six thousand years for an observer. As quoted in The Martyrs of Science; or, the Lives of Galileo, Tycho Brahe, and Kepler (1841) by David Brewster, p. 197. This has sometimes been misquoted as "It may be well to wait a century for a reader, as God has waited six thousand years for an observer." Variant translation: I feel carried away and possessed by an unutterable rapture over the divine spectacle of heavenly harmony... I write a book for the present time, or for posterity. It is all the same to me. It may wait a hundred years for its readers, as God has also waited six thousand years for an onlooker. As quoted in Calculus. Multivariable (2006) by Steven G. Krantz and Brian E. Blank. p. 126 Variant translation: I am stealing the golden vessels of the Egyptians to build a tabernacle to my God from them, far far away from the boundaries of Egypt. If you forgive me, I shall rejoice.; if you are enraged with me, I shall bear it. See, I cast the die, and I write the book. Whether it is to be read by the people of the present or of the future makes no difference: let it await its reader for a hundred years, if God himself has stood ready for six thousand years for one to study him. Unsourced translation

Samuel Butler (poet) photo
Winston S. Churchill photo
Letitia Elizabeth Landon photo
Richard Bach photo
H. Havelock Ellis photo

„The sun and the moon and the stars would have disappeared long ago…had they happened to be within the reach of predatory human hands.“

—  H. Havelock Ellis British physician, writer, and social reformer 1859 - 1939
The Dance of Life http://www.gutenberg.net.au/ebooks03/0300671.txt (1923), Ch. 7

Lewis Carroll photo
Henry David Thoreau photo

„Only that day dawns to which we are awake. There is more day to dawn. The sun is but a morning star.“

—  Henry David Thoreau, Walden
Walden (1854), Context: Only that day dawns to which we are awake. There is more day to dawn. The sun is but a morning star.<!--p.375

Margaret Thatcher photo

„It was a lovely morning. We have not had many lovely days. And the sun was just coming through the stained glass windows and falling on some flowers right across the church and it just occurred to me that this was the day I was meant not to see.“

—  Margaret Thatcher British stateswoman and politician 1925 - 2013
Second term as Prime Minister, TV Interview for Channel 4 A plus 4 (15 October 1984) http://www.margaretthatcher.org/speeches/displaydocument.asp?docid=105764, referring to the Brighton bombing in which the IRA attempted to assassinate her.

David Byrne photo

„Race the roaring Fraser to the sea.“

—  Stan Rogers Folk singer 1949 - 1983
Northwest Passage (1981)

John Townsend Trowbridge photo
Johanna Spyri photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“