„You can only protect your liberties in this world by protecting the other man's freedom. You can only be free if I am free.“

—  Clarence Darrow, Address to the court in People v. Lloyd (1920)
Clarence Darrow photo
Clarence Darrow11
1857 - 1938

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Tony Blair photo

„We can only protect liberty by making it relevant to the modern world.“

—  Tony Blair former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom 1953
2000s, In full: Tony Blair's speech http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/5382590.stm, BBC News online. Final speech to the Labour Party Annual Conference as Leader, 26 September 2006.

Alejandro Jodorowsky photo
Nelson Mandela photo

„Only free men can negotiate; prisoners cannot enter into contracts. Your freedom and mine cannot be separated.“

—  Nelson Mandela President of South Africa, anti-apartheid activist 1918 - 2013
1980s, Refusing to bargain for freedom after 21 years in prison, as quoted in TIME (25 February 1985)

John F. Kennedy photo

„With your help, and the help of other free men, this crisis can be surmounted. Freedom can prevail and peace can endure.“

—  John F. Kennedy 35th president of the United States of America 1917 - 1963
1961, Berlin Crisis speech, Context: The steps I have indicated tonight are aimed at avoiding that war. To sum it all up: we seek peace — but we shall not surrender. That is the central meaning of this crisis, and the meaning of your government's policy. With your help, and the help of other free men, this crisis can be surmounted. Freedom can prevail and peace can endure.

John Gray photo
Ajahn Brahm photo
Ai Weiwei photo
Glenn Beck photo

„You cannot take away freedom to protect it, you cannot destroy the free market to save it, and you cannot uphold freedom of speech by silencing those with whom you disagree. To take rights away to defend them or to spend your way out of debt defies common sense.“

—  Glenn Beck U.S. talk radio and television host 1964
2000s, 2009, The Reshaping and Redefining of America Glenn Beck's Common Sense: The Case Against an Out-of-Control Government, Inspired by Thomas Paine 2009-06-16 Threshold Editions 1439168571 17

Sarada Devi photo

„Everything, husband, wife, or even the body, is only illusory. These are all shackles of illusion. Unless you can free yourself from these bondages, you will never be able to go to the other shore of the world.“

—  Sarada Devi Hindu religious figure, spiritual consort of Ramakrishna 1853 - 1920
[Swami Tapasyananda, Swami Nikhilananda, Sri Sarada Devi, the Holy Mother; Life and Conversations, 261]

William McKinley photo
Mikhail Bakunin photo

„I am not myself free or human until or unless I recognize the freedom and humanity of all my fellowmen.
Only in respecting their human character do I respect my own. …
I am truly free only when all human beings, men and women, are equally free. The freedom of other men, far from negating or limiting my freedom, is, on the contrary, its necessary premise and confirmation.“

—  Mikhail Bakunin Russian revolutionary, philosopher, and theorist of collectivist anarchism 1814 - 1876
Man, Society, and Freedom (1871), Context: The materialistic, realistic, and collectivist conception of freedom, as opposed to the idealistic, is this: Man becomes conscious of himself and his humanity only in society and only by the collective action of the whole society. He frees himself from the yoke of external nature only by collective and social labor, which alone can transform the earth into an abode favorable to the development of humanity. Without such material emancipation the intellectual and moral emancipation of the individual is impossible. He can emancipate himself from the yoke of his own nature, i. e. subordinate his instincts and the movements of his body to the conscious direction of his mind, the development of which is fostered only by education and training. But education and training are preeminently and exclusively social … hence the isolated individual cannot possibly become conscious of his freedom. To be free … means to be acknowledged and treated as such by all his fellowmen. The liberty of every individual is only the reflection of his own humanity, or his human right through the conscience of all free men, his brothers and his equals. I can feel free only in the presence of and in relationship with other men. In the presence of an inferior species of animal I am neither free nor a man, because this animal is incapable of conceiving and consequently recognizing my humanity. I am not myself free or human until or unless I recognize the freedom and humanity of all my fellowmen. Only in respecting their human character do I respect my own.... I am truly free only when all human beings, men and women, are equally free. The freedom of other men, far from negating or limiting my freedom, is, on the contrary, its necessary premise and confirmation. Variant translations: A natural society, in the midst of which every man is born and outside of which he could never become a rational and free being, becomes humanized only in the measure that all men comprising it become, individually and collectively, free to an ever greater extent. Note 1. To be personally free means for every man living in a social milieu not to surrender his thought or will to any authority but his own reason and his own understanding of justice; in a word, not to recognize any other truth but the one which he himself has arrived at, and not to submit to any other law but the one accepted by his own conscience. Such is the indispensable condition for the observance of human dignity, the incontestable right of man, the sign of his humanity. To be free collectively means to live among free people and to be free by virtue of their freedom. As we have already pointed out, man cannot become a rational being, possessing a rational will, (and consequently he could not achieve individual freedom) apart from society and without its aid. Thus the freedom of everyone is the result of universal solidarity. But if we recognize this solidarity as the basis and condition of every individual freedom, it becomes evident that a man living among slaves, even in the capacity of their master, will necessarily become the slave of that state of slavery, and that only by emancipating himself from such slavery will he become free himself. Thus, too, the freedom of all is essential to my freedom. And it follows that it would be fallacious to maintain that the freedom of all constitutes a limit for and a limitation upon my freedom, for that would be tantamount to the denial of such freedom. On the contrary, universal freedom represents the necessary affirmation and boundless expansion of individual freedom. This passage was translated as Part III : The System of Anarchism , Ch. 13: Summation, Section VI, in The Political Philosophy of Bakunin : Scientific Anarchism (1953), compiled and edited by G. P. Maximoff Man does not become man, nor does he achieve awareness or realization of his humanity, other than in society and in the collective movement of the whole society; he only shakes off the yoke of internal nature through collective or social labor... and without his material emancipation there can be no intellectual or moral emancipation for anyone... man in isolation can have no awareness of his liberty. Being free for man means being acknowledged, considered and treated as such by another man, and by all the men around him. Liberty is therefore a feature not of isolation but of interaction, not of exclusion but rather of connection... I myself am human and free only to the extent that I acknowledge the humanity and liberty of all my fellows... I am properly free when all the men and women about me are equally free. Far from being a limitation or a denial of my liberty, the liberty of another is its necessary condition and confirmation.

Nisargadatta Maharaj photo
Fausto Cercignani photo

„Secret thoughts are only half free: they fly undisturbed in the skies of the inner freedom, but they can never leave them.“

—  Fausto Cercignani Italian scholar, essayist and poet 1941
Examples of self-translation (c. 2004), Quotes - Zitate - Citations - Citazioni

Arthur Schopenhauer photo
Alberto Gonzales photo
Swami Vivekananda photo
H.L. Mencken photo
Stefan Zweig photo
Ayn Rand photo
Fyodor Dostoyevsky photo

„Love is such a priceless treasure that you can redeem the whole world by it, and cleanse not only your own sins but the sins of others.“

—  Fyodor Dostoyevsky Russian author 1821 - 1881
The Brothers Karamazov (1879–1880), Context: If you are penitent, you love. And if you love you are of God. All things are atoned for, all things are saved by love. If I, a sinner even as you are, am tender with you and have pity on you, how much more will God have pity upon you. Love is such a priceless treasure that you can redeem the whole world by it, and cleanse not only your own sins but the sins of others. Book II, ch. 3 (trans. Constance Garnett) The Elder Zossima, speaking to a devout widow afraid of death

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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