„Life, with its rules, its obligations, and its freedoms, is like a sonnet: You're given the form, but you have to write the sonnet yourself. - Mrs. Whatsit“

—  Madeleine L'Engle, livro A Wrinkle in Time
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Madeleine L'Engle2
1918 - 2007
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„Cease from sonneting, my brothers; let us fashion songs from life.“

—  James Branch Cabell American author 1879 - 1958
The Certain Hour (1916), Context: We are talking over telephones, as Shakespeare could not talk; We are riding out in motor-cars where Homer had to walk; And pictures Dante labored on of mediaeval Hell The nearest cinematograph paints quicker, and as well. But ye copy, copy always; — and ye marvel when ye find This new beauty, that new meaning, — while a model stands behind, Waiting, young and fair as ever, till some singer turn and trace Something of the deathless wonder of life lived in any place. Hey, my masters, turn from piddling to the turmoil and the strife! Cease from sonneting, my brothers; let us fashion songs from life. "Auctorial Induction"

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„I believe that the luxuriance of Shakespeare's dramatic instinct largely dominates that outburst of lyric melody which gives the Sonnets their life.“

—  Sidney Lee English biographer and critic 1859 - 1926
"The Impersonal Aspect of Shakespeare's Art" (English Association Leaflet, 13, July 1909)

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„You measure democracy by the freedom it gives its dissidents, not the freedom it gives its assimilated conformists.“

—  Abbie Hoffman American political and social activist 1936 - 1989
Tikkun (July-August 1989); also quoted in The Best Liberal Quotes Ever : Why the Left is Right (2004) by William P. Martin, p. 51.

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„Power operates only destructively, bent always on forcing every manifestation of life into the straitjacket of its laws. Its intellectual form of expression is dead dogma, its physical form brute force.“

—  Rudolf Rocker, livro Anarcho-Syndicalism
Anarcho-Syndicalism (1938), Context: Power operates only destructively, bent always on forcing every manifestation of life into the straitjacket of its laws. Its intellectual form of expression is dead dogma, its physical form brute force. And this unintelligence of its objectives sets its stamp on its supporters also and renders them stupid and brutal, even when they were originally endowed with the best of talents. One who is constantly striving to force everything into a mechanical order at last becomes a machine himself and loses all human feeling. It was from the understanding of this that modern Anarchism was born and now draws its moral force. Only freedom can inspire men to great things and bring about social and political transformations. The art of ruling men has never been the art of educating men and inspiring them to a new shaping of their lives. Dreary compulsion has at its command only lifeless drill, which smothers any vital initiative at its birth and can bring forth only subjects, not free men. Freedom is the very essence of life, the impelling force in all intellectual and social development, the creator of every new outlook for the future of mankind. The liberation of man from economic exploitation and from intellectual and political oppression, which finds its finest expression in the world-philosophy of Anarchism, is the first prerequisite for the evolution of a higher social culture and a new humanity. Ch. 1 "Anarchism: Its Aims and Purposes"

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„Ethics is in its unqualified form extended responsibility to everything that has life.“

—  Albert Schweitzer French-German physician, theologian, musician and philosopher 1875 - 1965
Kulturphilosophie (1923), Vol. 2 : Civilization and Ethics, Context: It is the fate of every truth to be an object of ridicule when it is first acclaimed. It was once considered foolish to suppose that black men were really human beings and ought to be treated as such. What was once foolish has now become a recognized truth. Today it is considered as exaggeration to proclaim constant respect for every form of life as being the serious demand of a rational ethic. But the time is coming when people will be amazed that the human race existed so long before it recognized that thoughtless injury to life is incompatible with real ethics. Ethics is in its unqualified form extended responsibility to everything that has life.

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„So long as you are a slave to the opinions of the many you have not yet approached freedom or tasted its nectar“

—  Julian (emperor) Roman Emperor, philosopher and writer 331 - 363
General sources, Context: So long as you are a slave to the opinions of the many you have not yet approached freedom or tasted its nectar… But I do not mean by this that we ought to be shameless before all men and to do what we ought not; but all that we refrain from and all that we do, let us not do or refrain from merely because it seems to the multitude somehow honorable or base, but because it is forbidden by reason and the god within us. As quoted in The Works of the Emperor Julian (1923) by Wilmer Cave France Wright, p. 47

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