„Asking a working writer what he thinks about critics is like asking a lamppost what it feels about dogs.“

—  John Osborne, Quoted in Time magazine, October 31, 1977. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/printout/0,8816,945814,00.html Also attributed to Christopher Hampton by the Sunday Times Magazine (16 October 1977)
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John Osborne1
1929 - 1994
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„Asking a working writer what he thinks about critics is like asking a lamp-post what it feels about dogs.“

—  Christopher Hampton British playwright, screenwriter and film director 1946
Sunday Times Magazine (London, October 16, 1977)

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„Most writers are trying to find what they think or feel. . . not simply working from the given, but toward the given, saying the unsayable and steadily asking, "What do I really feel about this?"“

—  Robert Penn Warren American poet, novelist, and literary critic 1905 - 1989
Context: Most writers are trying to find what they think or feel... not simply working from the given, but toward the given, saying the unsayable and steadily asking, "What do I really feel about this?" National Observer (6 February 1967)

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„[When asked if he could think of a cure for a dog who eats soil]“

—  Noel Fielding British comedian and actor 1973
I'll sleep with her. I’m a special kind of vet - people bring the animals in, and I sleep with them. Do you have any sick animals that need some time with a vet? [...] What I was saying was that I was going to start a vet practice. People would bring me their sick animals and I’d sleep with them. Turtles. Parakeets. I’d give parakeets blow-jobs. I’d go around the zoo, like James Herriot... saying ‘Giraffes? Really? Bring them to me.’

Czeslaw Milosz photo

„I still think too much about the mothers
And ask what is man born of woman.“

—  Czeslaw Milosz Polish, poet, diplomat, prosaist, writer, and translator 1911 - 2004
Context: I still think too much about the mothers And ask what is man born of woman. He curls himself up and protects his head While he is kicked by heavy boots; on fire and running, He burns with bright flame; a bulldozer sweeps him into a clay pit. Her child. Embracing a teddy bear. Conceived in ecstasy. "Preparation," trans. Czesław Miłosz and Robert Hass

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„To ask a politician to lead us is to ask the tail of a dog to lead the dog.“

—  Buckminster Fuller American architect, systems theorist, author, designer, inventor and futurist 1895 - 1983
Context: Technology paces industry, but there's a long lag in the process. Industry paces economics. It changes the tools, a great ecological change. And in that manner we come finally to everyday life. The politician is someone who deals in man's problems of adjustment. To ask a politician to lead us is to ask the tail of a dog to lead the dog. "The Designers and the Politicians" (1962), later published in Beyond Left & Right : Radical Thought for Our Times (1968) by Richard Kostelanetz, p. 368

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„A politician's words reveal less about what he thinks about his subject than what he thinks about his audience.“

—  George Will American newspaper columnist, journalist, and author 1941
Quoted in A Ford Not A Lincoln (1975), Richard Reeves, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, ch, 1 ; as cited by The Columbia Dictionary of Quotations (1993), ed. Robert Andrews, Columbia University Press, p. 707