„You understand your responsibilities better than guardians twice your age. You'll do what you have to do to succeed.“

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„And try not to get too depressed in the part of the journey, because there’s a professional responsibility. If you are depressed, you can’t motivate your staff to extraordinary measures. So you have to keep your own spirits up even though you well understand that you don’t know what you’re doing.“

—  Andrew S. Grove Hungarian-born American businessman, engineer, and author 1936 - 2016
Cited in: " Andy Grove Tells The Truth About What Great Leaders Do http://bobsutton.typepad.com/my_weblog/2007/03/andy_grove_tell.html." bobsutton.typepad.com/my weblog. by Bob Sutton, March 11, 2007.

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„The what you have to say depends on your age.“

—  Matthew Arnold English poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector of schools 1822 - 1888
Context: Had Shakespeare and Milton lived in the atmosphere of modern feeling, had they had the multitude of new thoughts and feelings to deal with a modern has, I think it likely the style of each would have been far less curious and exquisite. For in a man style is the saying in the best way what you have to say. The what you have to say depends on your age. In the 17th century it was a smaller harvest than now, and sooner to be reaped; and therefore to its reaper was left time to stow it more finely and curiously. Still more was this the case in the ancient world. The poet's matter being the hitherto experience of the world, and his own, increases with every century. Letter to Arthur Hugh Clough (December 1847/early 1848)

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„You should have access to ideas and information regardless of your age. If anyone is going to limit or guide a young person, it should be the parent or guardian — and only the parent or guardian.“

—  Judith Krug librarian and freedom of speech proponent 1940 - 2009
"A Library That Would Rather Block Than Offend" http://www.nytimes.com/library/cyber/week/011897library-florida.html by Pamela Mendels, The New York Times (January 18, 1997)

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„You foolish man, you do not understand your own foolish business.“

—  Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield British statesman and man of letters 1694 - 1773
Attributed to Chesterfield in his 1833 edition of Horace Walpole's letters to Sir Horace Mann by George Agar-Ellis, 1st Baron Dover. The quotation has been attributed to many others, such as Lord Chief Justice Campbell, William Henry Maule (in the form "You silly old fool, you don't even know the alphabet of your own silly old business"), Sir William Harcourt, Lord Pembroke, Lord Westbury, and to an anonymous judge, and said to have been spoken in court to Garter King at Arms, Rouge Dragon Pursuivant, or some other high-ranking herald, who had confused a "bend" with a "bar" or had demanded fees to which he was not entitled. George Bernard Shaw quotes it in Pygmalion (1912) in the form, "The silly people dont [sic] know their own silly business." The quotation seems to appear first in Charles Jenner's The Placid Man: Or, The Memoirs of Sir Charles Beville (1770): "Sir Harry Clayton ... was perhaps far better qualified to have written a Peerage of England than Garter King at Arms, or Rouge Dragon, or any of those parti-coloured officers of the court of honor, who, as a great man complained on a late solemnity, are but too often so silly as not to know their own silly business." "Old Lord Pembroke" (Henry Herbert, 9th Earl of Pembroke) is said by Horace Walpole (in a letter of May 28, 1774 to the Rev. William Cole) to have directed the quip, "Thou silly fellow! Thou dost not know thy own silly business," at John Anstis, Garter King at Arms. Edmund Burke also quotes it ("'Silly man, that dost not know thy own silly trade!' was once well said: but the trade here is not silly.") in a "Speech in the Impeachment of Warren Hastings, Esq." on May 7, 1789. Chesterfield or Pembroke fit best in point of time.

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