„All artists are willing to suffer for their work. But why are so few prepared to learn to draw?“

—  Banksy
 Banksy photo
Banksy1
1974
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„I have never learned to draw a hand well enough, so why should I stop trying now?“

— Jack Levine American artist 1915 - 2010
Selden Rodman, Conversations With Artists, 1956.

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„Thinking is the hardest work there is, which is probably the reason why so few engage in it.“

— Henry Ford American industrialist 1863 - 1947
As quoted in The High School Teacher, Vol. XI (1935), p. 60

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„Flaubert spoke true: to succeed a great artist must have both character and fanaticism and few in this country are willing to pay the price.“

— Cyril Connolly British author 1903 - 1974
Context: Flaubert spoke true: to succeed a great artist must have both character and fanaticism and few in this country are willing to pay the price. Our writers have either no personality and therefore no style or a false personality and therefore a bad style; they mistake prejudice for energy and accept the sensation of material well-being as a system of thought. Part III: La Clé des Chants (p. 93)

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„There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work and learning from failure.“

— Colin Powell Former U.S. Secretary of State and retired four-star general 1937
As quoted in The Leadership Secrets of Colin Powell (2003) by Oren Harari, p. 164.

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„Most works of art are, necessarily, bad...; one suffers through the many for the few.“

— Randall Jarrell poet, critic, novelist, essayist 1914 - 1965
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„Lafferty's use of displacement is not unique, but so few writers have consciously attempted the process, and their works are so varied, that there are no unifying articles, no language for the critic with a day job to draw on.“

— R. A. Lafferty American writer 1914 - 2002
Context: Those individuals looking from within the SF world may lack, or simply disdain, the linguistic and critical skills needed to begin to reveal that in Lafferty's work there is much more going on than meets the eye. The brave individuals who have attempted to do so have either merely produced fulsome praise or attempted to classify Lafferty's writings on the basis of superficialities (i. e., calling him a surrealist). Lafferty's use of displacement is not unique, but so few writers have consciously attempted the process, and their works are so varied, that there are no unifying articles, no language for the critic with a day job to draw on. Some bright lad or lass (with the appropriate dignifying letters following their names) may read this and look for the method of displacement in H. P. Lovecraft, James Joyce, Robert Pinget, Gilbert Sorrentino, Flann O'Brien, R. A. Lafferty, Howard Waldrop, and R. A. Wilson. Now there's a book worth reading. The astute observer will note that all the names on the list are Irish, saving those which are not. Don Webb, in "R. A. Lafferty: Effective Arcanum" at Revolution Science Fiction http://www.revolutionsf.com/article.php?id=1110

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„A composition should be simple and clear. That is why the drawings of children and primitives are so strong.“

— George Grosz German artist 1893 - 1959
In: a student's unpublished papers 'Notes on Drawing and Water Golor, 1935-36', George Grosz estate, Princeton, N.J.; as quoted in: George Grosz: Leben und Werk, ed. Uwe M. Schneede; Verlag Gerd Hatje, Stuttgart 1975, p. 38 In the 1930's Grosz encouraged as art-teacher his students at the Art Students League in New York to study children's drawings

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„Of course I should be very happy to sell a drawing but I am happier still when a real artist like Weissenbruch says about an unsalable??? study or drawing: "That is true to nature, I could work from that myself."“

— Vincent Van Gogh Dutch post-Impressionist painter (1853-1890) 1853 - 1890
quote in his letter to brother Theo, from The Hague, The Netherlands in Febr. 1882; as quoted in Vincent van Gogh, edited by Alfred H. Barr; Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1935 https://www.moma.org/documents/moma_catalogue_1996_300061887.pdf, p. 20 (letter 177)

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„The reason why so few good books are written is, that so few people that can write know anything.“

— Walter Bagehot British journalist, businessman, and essayist 1826 - 1877
Context: The reason why so few good books are written is, that so few people that can write know anything. In general an author has always lived in a room, has read books, has cultivated science, is acquainted with the style and sentiments of the best authors, but he is out of the way of employing his own eyes and ears. He has nothing to hear and nothing to see. His life is a vacuum. Shakespeare

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