„There is no man on the face of the earth who can satisfy the deepest longings of a woman's heart--God made us in such a way that we can never be truly satisfied with anything or anyone less than Himself“

Nancy Leigh DeMoss4
American radio host 1958
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Richard Chenevix Trench photo

„None but God can satisfy the longings of an immortal soul; that as the heart was made for Him, so He only can fill it.“

—  Richard Chenevix Trench Irish bishop 1807 - 1886
Notes on the Parables, Prodigal Son; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 321.

 Augustus photo

„My dear Tiberius, you must not give way to youthful emotion or take it to heart if anyone speaks ill of me; let us be satisfied if we can make people stop short at unkind words.“

—  Augustus founder of Julio-Claudian dynasty and first emperor of the Roman Empire -63 - 14 a.C.
Suetonius, Divus Augustus, paragraph 51. Translation: Robert Graves, 1957. Ut vides, klimaktera communem seniorum omnium tertium et sexagesimum annum evasimus. I have escaped, as you see, the common climacteric of all old men—my sixty-third year. Epistle to Caius Caesar (Aul. Gell. Noct. Att. xv. 7.), written on 23 September A.D. 1.

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G. K. Chesterton photo

„The riddles of God are more satisfying than the solutions of man.“

—  G. K. Chesterton English mystery novelist and Christian apologist 1874 - 1936
"The Book of Job: An introduction" (1907)

N. K. Jemisin photo
Thomas Aquinas photo

„God alone can satisfy the will of a human being.“

—  Thomas Aquinas Italian Dominican scholastic philosopher of the Roman Catholic Church 1225 - 1274
Context: Now the object of the will, i. e., of man's appetite, is the universal good... Hence it is evident that nothing can lull the human will but the universal good. This is to be found, not in any creature, but in God alone; because every creature has goodness by participation. Thus God alone can satisfy the will of a human being. I–II, q. 2, art. 8

Robert G. Ingersoll photo

„Gentlemen, you can never make me believe — no statute can ever convince me, that there is any infinite Being in this universe who hates an honest man. It is impossible to satisfy me that there is any God, or can be any God, who holds in abhorrence a soul that has the courage to express his thought.“

—  Robert G. Ingersoll Union United States Army officer 1833 - 1899
Context: Gentlemen, you can never make me believe — no statute can ever convince me, that there is any infinite Being in this universe who hates an honest man. It is impossible to satisfy me that there is any God, or can be any God, who holds in abhorrence a soul that has the courage to express his thought. Neither can the whole world convince me that any man should be punished, either in this world or in the next, for being candid with his fellow-men. If you send men to the penitentiary for speaking their thoughts, for endeavoring to enlighten their fellows, then the penitentiary will become a place of honor, and the victim will step from it — not stained, not disgraced, but clad in robes of glory. Let us take one more step. What is holy, what is sacred? I reply that human happiness is holy, human rights are holy. The body and soul of man — these are sacred. The liberty of man is of far more importance than any book; the rights of man, more sacred than any religion — than any Scriptures, whether inspired or not. What we want is the truth, and does any one suppose that all of the truth is confined in one book — that the mysteries of the whole world are explained by one volume? All that is — all that conveys information to man — all that has been produced by the past — all that now exists — should be considered by an intelligent man. All the known truths of this world — all the philosophy, all the poems, all the pictures, all the statues, all the entrancing music — the prattle of babes, the lullaby of mothers, the words of honest men, the trumpet calls to duty — all these make up the bible of the world — everything that is noble and true and free, you will find in this great book. If we wish to be true to ourselves, — if we wish to benefit our fellow-men — if we wish to live honorable lives — we will give to every other human being every right that we claim for ourselves.

Florence Nightingale photo

„True it is that we can only create a heaven for ourselves and others "by the merits of Another," since it is only by working in accordance with God's Laws that we can do anything. But there is nothing at all in these prayers as if God's anger had to be bought off, as if He had to be bribed into giving us heaven by sufferings merely "to satisfy God's justice."“

—  Florence Nightingale English social reformer and statistician, and the founder of modern nursing 1820 - 1910
Context: These old Mystics whom we call superstitious were far before us in their ideas of God and of prayer (that is of our communion with God). "Prayer," says a mystic of the 16th century, "is to ask not what we wish of God, but what God wishes of us." "Master who hast made and formed the vessel of the body of Thy creature, and hast put within so great a treasure, the Soul, which bears the image of Thee": so begins a dying prayer of the 14th century. In it and in the other prayers of the Mystics there is scarcely a petition. There is never a word of the theory that God's dealings with us are to show His "power"; still less of the theory that "of His own good pleasure" He has " predestined" any souls to eternal damnation. There is little mention of heaven for self; of desire of happiness for self, none. It is singular how little mention there is either of "intercession " or of " Atonement by Another's merits." True it is that we can only create a heaven for ourselves and others "by the merits of Another," since it is only by working in accordance with God's Laws that we can do anything. But there is nothing at all in these prayers as if God's anger had to be bought off, as if He had to be bribed into giving us heaven by sufferings merely "to satisfy God's justice." In the dying prayers, there is nothing of the "egotism of death." It is the reformation of God's church—that is, God's children, for whom the self would give itself, that occupies the dying thoughts. There is not often a desire to be released from trouble and suffering. On the contrary, there is often a desire to suffer the greatest suffering, and to offer the greatest offering, with even greater pain, if so any work can be done. And still, this, and all, is ascribed to God's goodness. The offering is not to buy anything by suffering, but — If only the suppliant can do anything for God's children! These suppliants did not live to see the " reformation" of God's children. No more will any who now offer these prayers. But at least we can all work towards such practical " reformation." The way to live with God is to live with Ideas — not merely to think about ideals, but to do and suffer for them. Those who have to work on men and women must above all things have their Spiritual Ideal, their purpose, ever present. The "mystical " state is the essence of common sense.

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Muqtada Sadr photo
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„God says he will never be satisfied with the infidels.“

—  Mohammed Omar Founder and former leader of the Taliban 1962 - 2013
Mullah Omar - in his own words http://www.guardian.co.uk/g2/story/0,3604,558076,00.html September 2001.

Charles Lindbergh photo

„Man must feel the earth to know himself and recognize his values... God made life simple. It is man who complicates it.“

—  Charles Lindbergh American aviator, author, inventor, explorer, and social activist 1902 - 1974
As quoted in Reader's Digest (July 1972)

Carly Fiorina photo

„Everyone truly does have God given gifts... Find them and use them, and don't let anyone else tell you that you are less than who you are.“

—  Carly Fiorina American corporate executive and politician 1954
David Webb Show http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2015/08/05/ohio-male-rnc-member-calls-carly-fiorina-hot-babe/ (5 August 2015).

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