„The most worth-while thing is to try to put happiness into the lives of others.“

Letter (September 1940)

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
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Robert Baden-Powell10
1857 - 1941

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„What is the worth of any thing,
But for the happiness 'twill bring?“

—  Richard Owen Cambridge British poet 1717 - 1802

"Learning: A Dialogue", line 23; in The Works of Richard Owen Cambridge (1803), Miscellaneous Verses, p. 10

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„Your job is to struggle until you drop dead. That's it. Stop trying to be happy. The day you stop trying to be happy you might have a chance to live.“

—  Michael Savage, livro The Savage Nation

The Savage Nation, 2011(?) (Audio: Michael Savage – Suicide Is Never An Option https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oIjOjPW2OM&feature=youtu.be&t=1m29s)
2011
Contexto: Just remember, it's not heroic to kill yourself, and it's a violation of God's Laws.... The way it was explained to me in my tradition is... you are not your own property. You are God's property.... You have no right to commit suicide, don't even think– it's not an option. See, like in America, everything is "choice". "It's your choice." It's NOT your choice. You have no choice, so don't even think about it. It's not your choice to make. Soon enough, God will come for you, okay? Leave it at that. And every time you have a suicidal ideation, just push it away, it's not you. It's the devil trying to put something inside your head. We live in such a sick society, that the demented people who run the mind games on our heads like you to believe that it's your choice whether to commit suicide or not. It's NOT your choice. It's immoral, and that's the end of it. You don't have to ponder everything like it's a choice. You have children, that's all you need to know. What would the world be like for them if you committed suicide, do you have any idea? What you've gotta do is just get back on the road and keep walking, and don't stare at the chasm. That's all. You stand on the edge of a road, look down at the chasm and you'll get dizzy and fall in. So stop staring at the chasm. Get back on the road, and go back down to the meadow, and be with your family. And go on continue the struggle. That's all there is to it. That's your job. Your job is to struggle until you drop dead. That's it. Stop trying to be happy. The day you stop trying to be happy you might have a chance to live.

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„Happiness is like being cool: the harder you try the less it's going to happen. So stop trying. Start living.“

—  Mark Manson American writer and blogger 1984

Fonte: https://twitter.com/IAmMarkManson/status/1085556786374029312

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„If money is all that a man makes, then he will be poor — poor in happiness, poor in all that makes life worth living.“

—  Herbert N. Casson Canadian journalist and writer 1869 - 1951

Herbert N. Casson cited in: Forbes magazine (1950) The Forbes scrapbook of Thoughts on the business of life. p. 302
1950s and later

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„To try to be happy is to try to build a machine with no other specification than that it shall run noiselessly.“

—  Robert Oppenheimer American theoretical physicist and professor of physics 1904 - 1967

Letter to his brother Frank (14 October 1929), published in Robert Oppenheimer : Letters and Recollections (1995) edited by Alice Kimball Smith, p. 136
Contexto: Everyone wants rather to be pleasing to women and that desire is not altogether, though it is very largely, a manifestation of vanity. But one cannot aim to be pleasing to women any more than one can aim to have taste, or beauty of expression, or happiness; for these things are not specific aims which one may learn to attain; they are descriptions of the adequacy of one's living. To try to be happy is to try to build a machine with no other specification than that it shall run noiselessly.

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„Happiest are the people who give most happiness to others.“

—  Denis Diderot French Enlightenment philosopher and encyclopædist 1713 - 1784

As quoted in Happyology by Harald W. Tietze, p. 28

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„The principles we live by, in business and in social life, are the most important part of happiness.“

—  Harry Harrison American science fiction author 1925 - 2012

This is the radio personality Harry Harrison (born 20 September 1930), quoted in Think Vol. 21, No. 1 (January 1955), and The Book of Positive Quotations (2007) edited by John Cook, Steve Deger, and Leslie Ann Gibson
Misattributed

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„The most surprising circumstance is that this letter, though written by an obscure person, was so happy in its effect as to put a stop to the persecution.“

—  Voltaire French writer, historian, and philosopher 1694 - 1778

The History of the Quakers (1762)
Contexto: This new patriarch Fox said one day to a justice of peace, before a large assembly of people. "Friend, take care what thou dost; God will soon punish thee for persecuting his saints." This magistrate, being one who besotted himself every day with bad beer and brandy, died of apoplexy two days after; just as he had signed a mittimus for imprisoning some Quakers. The sudden death of this justice was not ascribed to his intemperance; but was universally looked upon as the effect of the holy man's predictions; so that this accident made more Quakers than a thousand sermons and as many shaking fits would have done. Cromwell, finding them increase daily, was willing to bring them over to his party, and for that purpose tried bribery; however, he found them incorruptible, which made him one day declare that this was the only religion he had ever met with that could resist the charms of gold.
The Quakers suffered several persecutions under Charles II; not upon a religious account, but for refusing to pay the tithes, for "theeing" and "thouing" the magistrates, and for refusing to take the oaths enacted by the laws.
At length Robert Barclay, a native of Scotland, presented to the king, in 1675, his "Apology for the Quakers"; a work as well drawn up as the subject could possibly admit. The dedication to Charles II, instead of being filled with mean, flattering encomiums, abounds with bold truths and the wisest counsels. "Thou hast tasted," says he to the king, at the close of his "Epistle Dedicatory," "of prosperity and adversity: thou hast been driven out of the country over which thou now reignest, and from the throne on which thou sittest: thou hast groaned beneath the yoke of oppression; therefore hast thou reason to know how hateful the oppressor is both to God and man. If, after all these warnings and advertisements, thou dost not turn unto the Lord, with all thy heart; but forget Him who remembered thee in thy distress, and give thyself up to follow lust and vanity, surely great will be thy guilt, and bitter thy condemnation. Instead of listening to the flatterers about thee, hearken only to the voice that is within thee, which never flatters. I am thy faithful friend and servant, Robert Barclay."
The most surprising circumstance is that this letter, though written by an obscure person, was so happy in its effect as to put a stop to the persecution.

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