„Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.“

—  Martin Luther King Junior, 1960s, Strength to Love (1963), Ch. 4 : Love in action, Sct. 3
Martin Luther King Junior photo
Martin Luther King Junior97
líder do movimento dos direitos civis dos negros nos Estado… 1929 - 1968

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„There is nothing more horrifying than stupidity in action.“

—  Jawaharlal Nehru Indian lawyer, statesman, and writer, first Prime Minister of India 1889 - 1964

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„There's nothing more dangerous than someone who wants to make the world a better place.“

—  Banksy pseudonymous England-based graffiti artist, political activist, and painter
Existencilism (2002)

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„Nothing matters if we aren't safe… The world has never been more dangerous than it is today.“

—  Marco Rubio U.S. Senator from state of Florida, United States; politician 1971
2010s, 2015, As quoted in "America's Next Top Fearmonger: The presidential candidates compete to scare the daylights out of the U.S. public." http://nationalinterest.org/feature/america%E2%80%99s-next-top-fearmonger-12954 (22 May 2015), by Robert Golan-Vilella, National Interest.

Edward Abbey photo

„There is no force more potent in the modern world than stupidity fueled by greed.“

—  Edward Abbey American author and essayist 1927 - 1989
A Voice Crying in the Wilderness (Vox Clamantis in Deserto) (1990), Ch. 11 : Money Et Cetera, p. 100

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„When love has once been sincere, how difficult it is to determine to love no more? 'Tis a thousand times more easy to renounce the world than love.“

—  Peter Abelard French scholastic philosopher, theologian and preeminent logician 1079 - 1142
Context: When love has once been sincere, how difficult it is to determine to love no more? 'Tis a thousand times more easy to renounce the world than love. I hate this deceitful faithless world; I think no more of it; but my heart, still wandering, will eternally make me feel the anguish of having lost you, in spite of all the convictions of my understanding. In the mean time tho' I so be so cowardly as to retract what you have read, do not suffer me to offer myself to your thoughts but under this last notion. Remember my last endeavours were to seduce your heart. You perished by my means, and I with you. The same waves swallowed us both up. We waited for death with indifference, and the same death had carried us headlong to the same punishments. But Providence has turned off this blow, and our shipwreck has thrown us into an haven. There are some whom the mercy of God saves by afflictions. Let my salvation be the fruit of your prayers! let me owe it to your tears, or exemplary holiness! Tho' my heart, Lord! be filled with the love of one of thy creatures, thy hand can, when it pleases, draw out of it those ideas which fill its whole capacity. To love Heloise truly is to leave her entirely to that quiet which retirement and virtue afford. I have resolved it: this letter shall be my last fault. Adieu. If I die here, I will give orders that my body be carried to the house of the Paraclete. You shall see me in that condition; not to demand tears from you, it will then be too late; weep rather for me now, to extinguish that fire which burns me. You shall see me, to strengthen your piety by the horror of this carcase; and my death, then more eloquent than I can be, will tell you what you love when you love a man. I hope you will be contented, when you have finished this mortal life, to be buried near me. Your cold ashes need then fear nothing, and my tomb will, by that means, be more rich and more renowned. Letter III : Abelard to Heloise, as translated by John Hughes<!-- 1782 edition -->

Lois McMaster Bujold photo

„Ignorance is not stupidity, but it might as well be.“

—  Lois McMaster Bujold, The Curse of Chalion
World of the Five Gods series, The Curse of Chalion (2000), p. 316

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„I sincerely believe, with you, that banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies; and that the principle of spending money to be paid by posterity, under the name of funding, is but swindling futurity on a large scale.“

—  Thomas Jefferson 3rd President of the United States of America 1743 - 1826
1810s, Context: We may say with truth and meaning that governments are more or less republican, as they have more or less of the element of popular election and control in their composition; and believing, as I do, that the mass of the citizens is the safest depository of their own rights, and especially, that the evils flowing from the duperies of the people are less injurious than those from the egoism of their agents, I am a friend to that composition of government which has in it the most of this ingredient. And I sincerely believe, with you, that banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies; and that the principle of spending money to be paid by posterity, under the name of funding, is but swindling futurity on a large scale. Letter to John Taylor (28 May 1816) ME 15:23 http://www.britannica.com/presidents/article-9116907

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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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