„Nature is a part of our humanity, and without some awareness and experience of that divine mystery man ceases to be man.“

— Henry Beston

Henry Beston23
American writer 1888 - 1968
Publicidade

Citações relacionadas

Max Planck photo

„Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.“

— Max Planck, Where is Science Going?
Where is Science Going? (1932) Variants: Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are a part of the mystery that we are trying to solve. Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature, for in the final analysis we ourselves are part of the mystery we are trying to solve.

Publicidade
Nikola Tesla photo
 Aristotle photo
Giovanni Pico della Mirandola photo
Vladimir Lenin photo

„One man with a gun can control a hundred without one.“

— Vladimir Lenin Russian politician, led the October Revolution 1870 - 1924

Susan B. Anthony photo
Publicidade
Vladimir Lenin photo

„One man with a gun can control 100 without one.“

— Vladimir Lenin Russian politician, led the October Revolution 1870 - 1924
Not found in Lenin's Collected Works. Began to surface on the internet in the mid-1990s.

Bob Marley photo
Booker T. Washington photo

„You can't hold a man down without staying down with him.“

— Booker T. Washington African-American educator, author, orator, and advisor 1856 - 1915
As quoted in The Great Quotations (1971) edited by George Seldes, p. 641

Pierre Teilhard De Chardin photo

„We are not human beings having a spiritual experience; we are spiritual beings having a human experience.“

— Pierre Teilhard De Chardin French philosopher and Jesuit priest 1881 - 1955
This is attributed to Pierre Teilhard de Chardin in The Joy of Kindness (1993), by Robert J. Furey, p. 138; but it is attributed to G. I. Gurdjieff in Beyond Prophecies and Predictions: Everyone's Guide To The Coming Changes (1993) by Moira Timms, p. 62; neither cite a source. It was widely popularized by Wayne Dyer, who often quotes it in his presentations, crediting it to Chardin, as does Stephen Covey in Living the 7 Habits : Stories of Courage and Inspiration (2000), p. 47 I spent a lot of time looking for this quote in all of Chardin' books and did not find it. That is the problem with the Internet, people simply copy and paste, therefore, it is our responsibility to keep an eye on errors of this kind. Be always careful to verify quotations that do not show a source (book/magazine, and page number, etc.) Variant: We are not human beings on a spiritual journey. We are spiritual beings on a human journey. The above "quotation" can be considered a paraphrase of Hegel's dictum that matter is spirit fallen into a state of self-otherness.

Publicidade
Francis Bacon photo

„The use of this feigned history hath been to give some shadow of satisfaction to the mind of man in those points wherein the nature of things doth deny it, the world being in proportion inferior to the soul“

— Francis Bacon English philosopher, statesman, scientist, jurist, and author 1561 - 1626
Context: The use of this feigned history hath been to give some shadow of satisfaction to the mind of man in those points wherein the nature of things doth deny it, the world being in proportion inferior to the soul; by reason whereof there is, agreeable to the spirit of man, a more ample greatness, a more exact goodness, and a more absolute variety, than can be found in the nature of things. Therefore, because the acts or events of true history have not that magnitude which satisfieth the mind of man, poesy feigneth acts and events greater and more heroical: because true history propoundeth the successes and issues of actions not so agreeable to the merits of virtue and vice, therefore poesy feigns them more just in retribution, and more according to revealed providence: because true history representeth actions and events more ordinary, and less interchanged, therefore poesy endueth them with more rareness, and more unexpected and alternative variations: so as it appeareth that poesy serveth and conferreth to magnanimity, morality, and to delectation. And therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shows of things to the desires of the mind; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind into the nature of things. Book II, iv, 2

Dugald Stewart photo

„Every man has some peculiar train of thought which he falls back upon when he is alone. This, to a great degree, moulds the man.“

— Dugald Stewart Scottish philosopher and mathematician 1753 - 1828
Dugald Stewart; reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 581

Ezra Pound photo
Hubert Reeves photo
Próximo