„Whatsoever therefore is consequent to a time of war, where every man is enemy to every man, the same consequent to the time wherein men live without other security than what their own strength and their own invention shall furnish them withal. In such condition there is no place for industry... no knowledge of the face of the earth; no account of time; no arts; no letters; no society; and which is worst of all, continual fear, and danger of violent death; and the life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.“

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Thomas Hobbes37
1588 - 1679
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Thomas Hobbes photo

„And the life of man solitary, poore, nasty, brutish, and short.“

— Thomas Hobbes English philosopher, born 1588 1588 - 1679
Context: Whatsoever therefore is consequent to a time of Warre, where every man is Enemy to every man; the same is consequent to the time, wherein men live without other security, than what their own strength, and their own invention shall furnish them withall. In such condition, there is no place for Industry; because the fruit thereof is uncertain: and consequently no Culture of the Earth; no Navigation, nor use of the commodities that may be imported by Sea; no commodious Building; no Instruments of moving, and removing things as require much force; no Knowledge of the face of the Earth; no account of Time; no Arts; no Letters; no Society; and which is worst of all, continuall feare, and danger of violent death; And the life of man solitary, poore, nasty, brutish, and short. The First Part, Chapter 13, p. 62.

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„The life of a journalist is poor, nasty, brutish and short. So is his style.“

— Stella Gibbons British writer 1902 - 1989
Foreword. Cf. Thomas Hobbes — "the life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short", in Leviathan (1651), Pt. I, Ch. 13.

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„Life is nasty, brutish, and short“

— Thomas Hobbes English philosopher, born 1588 1588 - 1679

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„The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.“

— Mark Twain American author and humorist 1835 - 1910
Not by Twain, but from Edward Abbey's A Voice Crying In The Wilderness (1989).

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„To every man upon this earth
Death cometh soon or late.
And how can man die better
Than facing fearful odds,
For the ashes of his fathers,
And the temples of his gods“

— Thomas Babington Macaulay, 1st Baron Macaulay British historian and Whig politician 1800 - 1859
Context: Then out spake brave Horatius, The Captain of the Gate: "To every man upon this earth Death cometh soon or late. And how can man die better Than facing fearful odds, For the ashes of his fathers, And the temples of his gods, And for the tender mother Who dandled him to rest, And for the wife who nurses His baby at her breast, And for the holy maidens Who feed the eternal flame, To save them from false Sextus That wrought the deed of shame?" Horatius, st. 26 & 27; this quote is often truncated to read:

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