„Such prizes and punishments are, if I may be allowed the expression, the bench of the soul, the instrument of slavery for the spirit.“

Maria Montessori photo
Maria Montessori11
Educadora e pedagoga italiana 1870 - 1952

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Sallustius photo

„It is not only spirits who punish the evil, the soul brings itself to judgment“

—  Sallustius Roman philosopher and writer
On the Gods and the Cosmos, Context: It is not only spirits who punish the evil, the soul brings itself to judgment: and also it is not right for those who endure for ever to attain everything in a short time: and also, there is need of human virtue. If punishment followed instantly upon sin, men would act justly from fear and have no virtue. XIX. Why sinners are not punished at once.

Maria Montessori photo
Frederick Douglass photo

„Old as the everlasting hills; immovable as the throne of God; and certain as the purposes of eternal power, against all hinderances, and against all delays, and despite all the mutations of human instrumentalities, it is the faith of my soul, that this anti-slavery cause will triumph.“

—  Frederick Douglass American social reformer, orator, writer and statesman 1818 - 1895
1850s, My Bondage and My Freedom (1855), The Anti-Slavery Movement. Extracts from a Lecture before Various. Anti-Slavery Bodies, in the Winter of 1855.

Michel Foucault photo

„The soul is the effect and instrument of a political anatomy; the soul is the prison of the body“

—  Michel Foucault, livro Vigiar e Punir
Discipline and Punish (1977), Context: The man described for us, whom we are invited to free, is already in himself the effect of a subjection much more profound than himself. A 'soul' inhabits him and brings him to existence... the soul is the effect and instrument of political anatomy; the soul is the prison of the body. Context: But let there be no misunderstanding: it is not that a real man, the object of knowledge, philosophical reflection or technological intervention, has been substituted for the soul, the illusion of theologians. The man described for us, whom we are invited to free, is already in himself the effect of a subjection more profound than himself. A 'soul' inhabits him and brings him to existence, which is itself a factor in the mastery that power exercises over the body. The soul is the effect and instrument of a political anatomy; the soul is the prison of the body.

Ralph Waldo Emerson photo

„But all the good of nature is the soul's, and may be had, if paid for in nature's lawful coin, that is, by labor which the heart and the head allow.“

—  Ralph Waldo Emerson American philosopher, essayist, and poet 1803 - 1882
1840s, Essays: First Series (1841), Compensation, Context: We feel defrauded of the retribution due to evil acts, because the criminal adheres to his vice and contumacy, and does not come to a crisis or judgment anywhere in visible nature. There is no stunning confutation of his nonsense before men and angels. Has he therefore outwitted the law? Inasmuch as he carries the malignity and the lie with him, he so far deceases from nature. In some manner there will be a demonstration of the wrong to the understanding also; but should we not see it, this deadly deduction makes square the eternal account. Neither can it be said, on the other hand, that the gain of rectitude must be bought by any loss. There is no penalty to virtue; no penalty to wisdom; they are proper additions of being. In a virtuous action, I properly am; in a virtuous act, I add to the world; I plant into deserts conquered from Chaos and Nothing, and see the darkness receding on the limits of the horizon. There can be no excess to love; none to knowledge; none to beauty, when these attributes are considered in the purest sense. The soul refuses limits, and always affirms an Optimism, never a Pessimism. His life is a progress, and not a station. His instinct is trust. Our instinct uses "more" and "less" in application to man, of the presence of the soul, and not of its absence; the brave man is greater than the coward; the true, the benevolent, the wise, is more a man, and not less, than the fool and knave. There is no tax on the good of virtue; for that is the incoming of God himself, or absolute existence, without any comparative. Material good has its tax, and if it came without desert or sweat, has no root in me, and the next wind will blow it away. But all the good of nature is the soul's, and may be had, if paid for in nature's lawful coin, that is, by labor which the heart and the head allow. I no longer wish to meet a good I do not earn, for example, to find a pot of buried gold, knowing that it brings with it new burdens. I do not wish more external goods, — neither possessions, nor honors, nor powers, nor persons. The gain is apparent; the tax is certain. But there is no tax on the knowledge that the compensation exists, and that it is not desirable to dig up treasure. Herein I rejoice with a serene eternal peace. I contract the boundaries of possible mischief. I learn the wisdom of St. Bernard, — "Nothing can work me damage except myself; the harm that I sustain I carry about with me, and never am a real sufferer but by my own fault."

Jean Toomer photo
Friedrich Schiller photo

„I speak with the Eternal through the instrument of nature, — through the world's history: I read the soul of the artist in his Apollo.“

—  Friedrich Schiller German poet, philosopher, historian, and playwright 1759 - 1805
The Philosophical Letters, Letter 4: Theosophy of Julius

Martha Graham photo

„I feel that the essence of dance is the expression of mankind — the landscape of the human soul.“

—  Martha Graham, Blood Memory
I Am A Dancer (1952), Context: I feel that the essence of dance is the expression of mankind — the landscape of the human soul. I hope that every dance I do reveals something of myself or some wonderful thing a human being can be.

Alfred North Whitehead photo

„The human body is an instrument for the production of art in the life of the human soul.“

—  Alfred North Whitehead English mathematician and philosopher 1861 - 1947
1930s, Adventures of Ideas (1933), p. 349.

Rudyard Kipling photo
Thomas Edison photo

„My mind is incapable of conceiving such a thing as a soul. I may be in error, and man may have a soul; but I simply do not believe it. What a soul may be is beyond my understanding.“

—  Thomas Edison American inventor and businessman 1847 - 1931
1920s, "Do We Live Again?" an interview with Edison, as quoted in Mr. Edison's New Argument from Design" in The Illustrated London News (3 May 1924).

Thomas Watson photo
Arvo Pärt photo
William Ernest Henley photo

„It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate:
I am the captain of my soul.“

—  William Ernest Henley, livro Invictus
Invictus (1875), This may have inspired later lines of "A Challenge" from "Quatrains" by James Benjamin Kenyon, published in An American Anthology, 1787-1900 (1901) edited by Edmund Clarence Stedman: Arise, O Soul, and gird thee up anew, Though the black camel Death kneel at thy gate; No beggar thou that thou for alms shouldst sue: Be the proud captain still of thine own fate.

Jean Cocteau photo

„Allow the power of the soul to grow as flagrant as the power of sex.“

—  Jean Cocteau French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, boxing manager and filmmaker 1889 - 1963
Diary of an Unknown (1988)

Ken Wilber photo
Frederick Douglass photo

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