„Amazing what we can self-rationalize when we really want something“

—  Harlan Coben, livro Six Years

Fonte: Six Years

Última atualização 22 de Junho de 2020. História

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„What we really want to do is what we are really meant to do.“

—  Julia Cameron, livro The Artist's Way

The Artist's Way (1992)
Contexto: What we really want to do is what we are really meant to do. When we do what we are meant to do, money comes to us, doors open for us, we feel useful, and the work we do feels like play to us. <!-- p. 108

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Geoffrey West photo

„I’ve always wanted to find the rules that govern everything. It’s amazing that such rules exist. It’s even more amazing that we can find them.“

—  Geoffrey West British physicist 1940

2010s
Fonte: Jonah Lehredec. " A Physicist Solves the City http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/19/magazine/19Urban_West-t.html?pagewanted=5&_r=1," in www.nytimes.com. Dec 17, 2010.

Ilchi Lee photo
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„When we want to do something while unconsciously certain to fail, we seek advice so we can blame someone else for the failure.“

—  Nassim Nicholas Taleb, livro The Bed of Procrustes: Philosophical and Practical Aphorisms

Fonte: The Bed of Procrustes: Philosophical and Practical Aphorisms (2010), p. 9

Maureen Johnson photo
Joyce Meyer photo
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Richard Feynman photo

„The worthwhile problems are the ones you can really solve or help solve, the ones you can really contribute something to. … No problem is too small or too trivial if we can really do something about it.“

—  Richard Feynman American theoretical physicist 1918 - 1988

letter to Koichi Mano (3 February 1966); published in Perfectly Reasonable Deviations from the Beaten Track: The Letters of Richard P. Feynman (2005), p. 198, 201
also quoted by Freeman Dyson in "Wise Man" http://www.nybooks.com/articles/18350, The New York Review of Books (20 October 2005)
Contexto: The worthwhile problems are the ones you can really solve or help solve, the ones you can really contribute something to. … No problem is too small or too trivial if we can really do something about it. You say you are a nameless man. You are not to your wife and to your child. You will not long remain so to your immediate colleagues if you can answer their simple questions when they come into your office. You are not nameless to me. Do not remain nameless to yourself — it is too sad a way to be. Know your place in the world and evaluate yourself fairly, not in terms of the naïve ideals of your own youth, nor in terms of what you erroneously imagine your teacher's ideals are.

Karl Popper photo

„When I speak of reason or rationalism, all I mean is the conviction that we can learn through criticism of our mistakes and errors, especially through criticism by others, and eventually also through self-criticism.“

—  Karl Popper Austrian-British philosopher of science 1902 - 1994

"On Freedom" in All Life is Problem Solving (1999)
Contexto: When I speak of reason or rationalism, all I mean is the conviction that we can learn through criticism of our mistakes and errors, especially through criticism by others, and eventually also through self-criticism. A rationalist is simply someone for whom it is more important to learn than to be proved right; someone who is willing to learn from others — not by simply taking over another's opinions, but by gladly allowing others to criticize his ideas and by gladly criticizing the ideas of others. The emphasis here is on the idea of criticism or, to be more precise, critical discussion. The genuine rationalist does not think that he or anyone else is in possession of the truth; nor does he think that mere criticism as such helps us achieve new ideas. But he does think that, in the sphere of ideas, only critical discussion can help us sort the wheat from the chaff. He is well aware that acceptance or rejection of an idea is never a purely rational matter; but he thinks that only critical discussion can give us the maturity to see an idea from more and more sides and to make a correct judgement of it.

Dave Eggers photo
Eric Hoffer photo

„We can never have enough of that which we really do not want, and… we run fastest and farthest from ourselves.“

—  Eric Hoffer, livro The True Believer

Section 37, Ch.6 Misfits
The True Believer (1951), Part Two: The Potential Converts