„Great minds have purpose, others have wishes. Little minds are tamed and subdued by misfortunes; but great minds rise above them.“

—  Washington Irving, livro The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent.

"Philip of Pokanoket : An Indian Memoir".
A more extensive statement not found as such in this work is attributed to Irving in Elbert Hubbard's Scrap Book (1923) edited by Roycroft Shop:
The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon (1819–1820)
Variante: Little minds are tamed and subdued by misfortune; but great minds rise above it.

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
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Washington Irving11
1783 - 1859
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Washington Irving photo

„Great minds have purposes, others have wishes.“

—  Washington Irving writer, historian and diplomat from the United States 1783 - 1859

François de La Rochefoucauld photo

„The stamp of great minds is to suggest much in few words; by contrast, little minds have the gift of talking a great deal and saying nothing.“

—  François de La Rochefoucauld, livro Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims

Comme c’est le caractère des grands esprits de faire entendre en peu de paroles beaucoup de choses, les petits esprits au contraire ont le don de beaucoup parler, et de ne rien dire.
Maxim 142.
Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims (1665–1678)

Ralph Waldo Emerson photo
Arthur Conan Doyle photo
Thomas Babington Macaulay, 1st Baron Macaulay photo
John Stuart Mill photo

„How can great minds be produced in a country where the test of a great mind is agreeing in the opinions of small minds?“

—  John Stuart Mill British philosopher and political economist 1806 - 1873

As quoted in Egoists: A Book of Supermen (1909) by James Huneker, p. 367

Carl von Clausewitz photo
Dan Brown photo
Albert Einstein photo
Rick Riordan photo
J. J. Abrams photo

„The experience I had seeing Star Wars for the first time was mind-blowing. Eleven is a great age to have your mind blown.“

—  J. J. Abrams American film and television producer and director 1966

The Fresno Bee interview (2015)
Contexto: The experience I had seeing Star Wars for the first time was mind-blowing. Eleven is a great age to have your mind blown. I will never forget that feeling of seeing "Long time ago, in a galaxy, far, far away" fade out. It was the first time a movie made me believe in another world that way.

Sigmund Freud photo

„The conscious mind may be compared to a fountain playing in the sun and falling back into the great subterranean pool of subconscious from which it rises.“

—  Sigmund Freud Austrian neurologist known as the founding father of psychoanalysis 1856 - 1939

As quoted in his obituary, in the New York Times, 24 September, 1939
Attributed from posthumous publications

Arthur Schopenhauer photo
John Steinbeck photo
Seneca the Younger photo
Blaise Pascal photo

„God only pours out his light into the mind after having subdued the rebellion of the will“

—  Blaise Pascal French mathematician, physicist, inventor, writer, and Christian philosopher 1623 - 1662

The Art of Persuasion
Contexto: God only pours out his light into the mind after having subdued the rebellion of the will by an altogether heavenly gentleness which charms and wins it.

Sherrilyn Kenyon photo
Eleanor Roosevelt photo

„Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people.“

—  Eleanor Roosevelt American politician, diplomat, and activist, and First Lady of the United States 1884 - 1962

Some evidence for Henry Buckle (1821-1862) as the source: see p.33 quotation https://books.google.com/books?id=2moaAAAAYAAJ&q=buckle#v=snippet&q=buckle&f=false
There are many published incidents of this as an anonymous proverb since at least 1948, and as a statement of Eleanor Roosevelt since at least 1992, but without any citation of an original source. It is also often attributed to Admiral Hyman G. Rickover but, though Rickover quoted this, he did not claim to be the author of it; in "The World of the Uneducated" in The Saturday Evening Post (28 November 1959), he prefaces it with "As the unknown sage puts it..."
Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, and little minds discuss people.
In this form it was quoted as an anonymous epigram in A Guide to Effective Public Speaking (1953) by Lawrence Henry Mouat
New York times Saturday review of books and art, 1931: ...Wanted, the correct quotation and origin of this expression: Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people...
Several other variants or derivatives of the expression exist, but none provide a definite author:
Great minds discuss ideas, mediocre minds discuss events, small minds discuss personalities.
Great minds discuss ideas
Average minds discuss events
Small minds discuss people
Small minds discuss things
Average minds discuss people
Great minds discuss ideas
...Be less curious about people and more curious about ideas. (Marie Curie, undated (died 1934), as quoted in Living Adventures in Science by Henry and Dana Lee Thomas, 1972)
...Some professor of psychology who has been eavesdropping for years makes the statement that "The best minds discuss ideas; the second in ranking talk about things; while the third group, or the least in mentality, gossip about people"… (Hardware age, Volume 123, 1929)
...He now reports that, "the best minds discuss ideas; the second ranking talks about things; while the third and lowest mentality – starved for ideas – gossips about people." (Printers' Ink, Volume 139, Issue 2, 1927, p. 87)
...It has been said long ago that there were three classes of people in the world, and while they are subject to variation, for elemental consideration they are useful. The first is that large class of people who talk about people; the next class are those who talk about things; and the third class are those who discuss ideas... (H. J. Derbyshire, "Origin of mental species", 1919)
...Mrs. Conklin points out certain bad conversational habits and suggests good ones, quoting Buckle's classic classification of talkers into three orders of intelligence — those who talk about nothing but persons, those who talk about things and those who discuss ideas... (review of Mary Greer Conklin's book Conversation: What to say and how to say it in The Continent, Jan. 23, 1913, p. 118)
...[ Henry Thomas Buckle's ] thoughts and conversations were always on a high level, and I recollect a saying of his which not only greatly impressed me at the time, but which I have ever since cherished as a test of the mental calibre of friends and acquaintances. Buckle said, in his dogmatic way: "Men and women range themselves into three classes or orders of intelligence; you can tell the lowest class by their habit of always talking about persons, the next by the fact that their habit is always to converse about things; the highest by their preference for the discussion of ideas"… (Charles Stewart, "Haud immemor. Reminescences of legal and social life in Edinburgh and London. 1850-1900", 1901, p. 33 http://www.mocavo.com/Haud-Immemor-by-Charles-Stewart-Reminiscences-of-Life-in-Edinburgh-and-London-1850-1900/608008/13?browse=true#63).
Disputed

Hyman George Rickover photo

„Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people.“

—  Hyman George Rickover United States admiral 1900 - 1986

Though Rickover quoted this, he did not claim to be the author of the statement. Using it in "The World of the Uneducated" in The Saturday Evening Post (28 November 1959), he prefaces it with "As the unknown sage puts it..." — It has sometimes been attributed to Eleanor Roosevelt, but without definite citation.
Some evidence for Henry Buckle (1821-1862) as the source: see p.33 quotation https://books.google.com/books?id=2moaAAAAYAAJ&q=buckle#v=snippet&q=buckle&f=false
Misattributed

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