„Writing is easy. All you have to do is cross out the wrong words.“

—  Mark Twain

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Mark Twain169
escritor, humorista e inventor norte-americano 1835 - 1910

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„The cross is there, of course, but "in the cross is joy of spirit." And love makes all things easy.“

—  Dorothy Day Social activist 1897 - 1980

On Pilgrimage (1948)
Contexto: We are not expecting Utopia here on this earth. But God meant things to be much easier than we have made them. A man has a natural right to food, clothing, and shelter. A certain amount of goods is necessary to lead a good life. A family needs work as well as bread. Property is proper to man. We must keep repeating these things. Eternal life begins now. "All the way to heaven is heaven, because He said, "I am the Way." The cross is there, of course, but "in the cross is joy of spirit." And love makes all things easy.

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„Freedom is… the right to write the wrong words.“

—  Patti Smith American singer-songwriter, poet and visual artist 1946

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„Writing is easy. All you do is stare at a blank sheet of paper until drops of blood form on your forehead.“

—  Gene Fowler American journalist 1890 - 1960

Attributed without citation in Janice R. Matthews et al. (2000) Successful Scientific Writing. p. 53
Sometimes attributed to Douglas Adams.

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„If you do not hear music in your words, you have put too much thought into your writing and not enough heart.“

—  Terry Brooks, Sometimes the Magic Works: Lessons from a Writing Life

Fonte: Sometimes the Magic Works: Lessons from a Writing Life

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„If you want to find Cherry-Tree Lane all you have to do is ask the Policeman at the cross-roads.“

—  P. L. Travers Australian-British novelist, actress and journalist 1899 - 1996

Ch. 1 "East-Wind"
Mary Poppins (1934)
Contexto: If you want to find Cherry-Tree Lane all you have to do is ask the Policeman at the cross-roads. He will push his helmet slightly to one side, scratch his head thoughtfully, and then he will point his huge white-gloved finger and say: "First to your right, second to your left, sharp right again, and you're there. Good-morning."
And sure enough, if you follow his directions exactly, you will be there — right in the middle of Cherry-Tree Lane, where the houses run down one side and the Park runs down the other and the cherry-trees go dancing right down the middle.
If you are looking for Number Seventeen — and it is more than likely that you will be, for this book is all about that particular house — you will very soon find it.

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„All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence you know.“

—  Ernest Hemingway, livro A Moveable Feast

Ch. 2
A Moveable Feast (1964)
Contexto: I would stand and look out over the roofs of Paris and think, "Do not worry. You have always written before and you will write now. All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence you know."

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„It is not easy to write a familiar style. Many people mistake a familiar for a vulgar style, and suppose that to write without affectation is to write at random. On the contrary, there is nothing that requires more precision, and, if I may so say, purity of expression, than the style I am speaking of. It utterly rejects not only all unmeaning pomp, but all low, cant phrases, and loose, unconnected, slipshod allusions. It is not to take the first word that offers, but the best word in common use; it is not to throw words together in any combinations we please, but to follow and avail ourselves of the true idiom of the language. To write a genuine familiar or truly English style, is to write as anyone would speak in common conversation who had a thorough command and choice of words, or who could discourse with ease, force, and perspicuity, setting aside all pedantic and oratorical flourishes… It is easy to affect a pompous style, to use a word twice as big as the thing you want to express: it is not so easy to pitch upon the very word that exactly fits it, out of eight or ten words equally common, equally intelligible, with nearly equal pretensions, it is a matter of some nicety and discrimination to pick out the very one the preferableness of which is scarcely perceptible, but decisive.“

—  William Hazlitt English writer 1778 - 1830

"On Familiar Style" (1821)
Table Talk: Essays On Men And Manners http://www.blupete.com/Literature/Essays/TableHazIV.htm (1821-1822)

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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“