„In the history of modern socialism this is a phenomenon, that the strife of the various trends within the socialist movement has from national become international.“

— Vladimír Iljič Lenin

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Vladimir Lenin foto

„Socialized medicine is the keystone to the arch of the socialist state.“

— Vladimir Lenin Russian politician, led the October Revolution 1870 - 1924
Fabricated quote from The Voluntary Way is the American Way (1949) by PR firm Whitaker and Baxter. According to The Heart of Power by David Blumenthal and James Morone (pp. 91-92) : Whitaker and Baxter published a fifteen-page pamphlet of questions and answers entitled The Voluntary Way is the American Way, which, deep in the Q&A, concocted a quotation from Lenin: :: Q: Would socialized medicine lead to socialization of other phases of American life? :: A: Lenin thought so. He declared: socialized medicine is the keystone to the arch of the socialist state. : Senator Murray asked the Library of Congress to track down the quote and, as expected, they found nothing like it—most scholars assume Whitaker and Baxter dreamed it up. Alternate form: "Socialized medicine is a keystone to the establishment of a socialist state."

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Joseph Beuys foto
Jesse Owens foto
Joachim Peiper foto

„I was a Nazi and I remain one... The Germany of today is no longer a great nation, it has become a province of Europe.“

— Joachim Peiper SS officer 1915 - 1976
Interview with a French writer Peiper spoke with in 1967, quoted in The Devil's Adjutant by Michael Reynolds, page 260.

Vladimir Lenin foto
W.E.B. Du Bois foto
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel foto
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Desmond Tutu foto

„We learn from history that we don't learn from history!“

— Desmond Tutu South African churchman, politician, archbishop, Nobel Prize winner 1931

Margaret Mead foto

„Never depend upon institutions or government to solve any problem. All social movements are founded by, guided by, motivated and seen through by the passion of individuals.“

— Margaret Mead American anthropologist 1902 - 1978
Attributed in Talent Development for English Language Learners: Identifying and Developing Potential (2013) by Michael S. Matthews, Ph.D. SBN-13:9781618211057 <!-- Sourcebooks, Incorporated Publication date: 11/15/2013. -->

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Helena Petrovna Blavatsky foto
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Edmund Husserl foto
Jimmy Carter foto

„I think as far as the adverse impact on the nation around
the world, this administration has been the worst in history...
The overt reversal of America's basic values as expressed by
previous administrations, including those of George H. W. Bush
and Ronald Reagan and Richard Nixon and others, has been the
most disturbing to me.“

— Jimmy Carter American politician, 39th president of the United States (in office from 1977 to 1981) 1924
Context: Who ever decided that Americans were so bad off in the seventies anyway? From the right-wing revisionist propaganda that has become accepted as fact, you'd think that Americans under President Carter were suffering through something like the worst of the Weimar Republic combined with the Siege of Leningrad. The truth is that on a macroeconomic level, the difference between the Carter era and the Reagan era was minimal. For instance, economic growth during the Carter Administration averaged 2.8 percent annually, while under Reagan, from 1982 to 1989, growth averaged 3.2 percent. Was it really worth killing ourselves over that extra.4 percent of growth? For a lucky few, yes. On the other key economic gauge, unemployment, the Carter years were actually better than Reagan's, averaging 6.7 pervent annually during his "malaise-stricken" term as compared to an average 7.3 percent unemployment rate during the glorious eight-year reign of Ronald Reagan. Under Carter, people worked less, got far more benefits, and the country grew almost the same average annual rate as Reagan. On the other hand, according to the Statistical Abstract of the United States for 1996, under Reagan life got worse for those who had it worse: the number of people below the poverty line increased in almost every year from 1981 (31.8 million) to 1992 (39.3 million). And yet, we are told America was in decline until Reagan came to power and that the country was gripped by this ethereal malaise. Where was this malaise? Whose America was in decline? The problem with the 1970s wasn't that America was in decline, it was that the plutocracy felt itself declining. And in the plutocrats' eyes, their fortunes are synonymous with America's. Mark Ames, Going Postal: Rage, Murder and Rebellion: From Reagan's Workplaces to Clinton's Columbine and Beyond (2005), p. 99

Benito Mussolini foto

„For this I have been and am a socialist“

— Benito Mussolini Duce and President of the Council of Ministers of Italy. Leader of the National Fascist Party and subsequent Republic... 1883 - 1945
Context: For this I have been and am a socialist. The accusation of inconsistency has no foundation. My conduct has always been straight in the sense of looking at the substance of things and not to the form. I adapted socialisticamente to reality. As the evolution of society belied many of the prophecies of Marx, the true socialism folded from possible to probable. The only feasible socialism socialisticamente is corporatism, confluence, balance and justice interests compared to the collective interest. As quoted in “Soliloquy for ‘freedom’ Trimellone island”, on the Italian Island of Trimelone, journalist Ivanoe Fossani, one of the last interviews of Mussolini, March 20, 1945, from Opera omnia, vol. 32. Interview is also known as "Testament of Benito Mussolini, or Testamento di Benito Mussolini. Also published under “Mussolini confessed to the stars”, Publishing House Latinitas, Rome, 1952. (Intervista di Ivanoe Fossani, Soliloquio in “libertà” all'isola Trimellone, Isola del Trimellone, 20 marzo 1945)

B.K.S. Iyengar foto
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