„In his face there came to be a brooding peace that is seen most often in the faces of the very sorrowful or the very wise. But still he wandered through the streets of the town, always silent and alone.“

—  Carson McCullers, livro The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter

Fonte: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
Carson McCullers photo
Carson McCullers4
1917 - 1967

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Romain Rolland photo

„And the silence of the struggle! … Oh! the peace of Nature, the tragic mask that covers the sorrowful and cruel face of Life!“

—  Romain Rolland French author 1866 - 1944

Jean-Christophe (1904 - 1912), Journey's End: The Burning Bush (1911)
Contexto: The slaughter accomplished by man is so small a thing of itself in the carnage of the universe! The animals devour each other. The peaceful plants, the silent trees, are ferocious beasts one to another. The serenity of the forests is only a commonplace of easy rhetoric for the literary men who only know Nature through their books!... In the forest hard by, a few yards away from the house, there were frightful struggles always toward. The murderous beeches flung themselves upon the pines with their lovely pinkish stems, hemmed in their slenderness with antique columns, and stifled them. They rushed down upon the oaks and smashed them, and made themselves crutches of them. The beeches were like Briareus with his hundred arms, ten trees in one tree! They dealt death all about them. And when, failing foes, they came together, they became entangled, piercing, cleaving, twining round each other like antediluvian monsters. Lower down, in the forest, the acacias had left the outskirts and plunged into the thick of it and, attacked the pinewoods, strangling and tearing up the roots of their foes, poisoning them with their secretions. It was a struggle to the death in which the victors at once took possession of the room and the spoils of the vanquished. Then the smaller monsters would finish the work of the great. Fungi, growing between the roots, would suck at the sick tree, and gradually empty it of its vitality. Black ants would grind exceeding small the rotting wood. Millions of invisible insects were gnawing, boring, reducing to dust what had once been life.... And the silence of the struggle!... Oh! the peace of Nature, the tragic mask that covers the sorrowful and cruel face of Life!

Emily Dickinson photo
Russell L. Ackoff photo
Barack Obama photo
Muhammad photo
Paul von Hindenburg photo

„Prosperity can come through peace alone.“

—  Paul von Hindenburg Prussian-German field marshal, statesman, and president of Germany 1847 - 1934

Contexto: Prosperity can come through peace alone. The German people are in favor of all possible means to make war impossible. I have seen three wars. A man who has seen three wars never will wish another war. He must be a friend of peace.
But I am not a pacifist. All my impressions of war are so bad that I could be for it only under the sternest necessity — the necessity of fighting Bolshevism or of defending one's country.

John F. Kennedy photo

„For to save mankind's future freedom, we must face up to any risk that is necessary. We will always seek peace — but we will never surrender.“

—  John F. Kennedy 35th president of the United States of America 1917 - 1963

1961, Address at the University of Washington
Contexto: No one should be under the illusion that negotiations for the sake of negotiations always advance the cause of peace. If for lack of preparation they break up in bitterness, the prospects of peace have been endangered. If they are made a forum for propaganda or a cover for aggression, the processes of peace have been abused. But it is a test of our national maturity to accept the fact that negotiations are not a contest spelling victory or defeat. They may succeed — they may fail. They are likely to be successful only if both sides reach an agreement which both regard as preferable to the status quo — an agreement in which each side can consider its own situation to be improved. And this is most difficult to obtain. But, while we shall negotiate freely, we shall not negotiate freedom. Our answer to the classic question of Patrick Henry is still no-life is not so dear, and peace is not so precious, "as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery." And that is our answer even though, for the first time since the ancient battles between Greek city-states, war entails the threat of total annihilation, of everything we know, of society itself. For to save mankind's future freedom, we must face up to any risk that is necessary. We will always seek peace — but we will never surrender.

Donovan photo

„It seemed — in 1968 — the possibilities of peace and brotherhood could be realised that very year. We're still working on it.“

—  Donovan Scottish singer, songwriter and guitarist 1946

During a performance for "Beatle Week" in Liverpool (27 August 2006), as prelude to singing "Hurdy Gurdy Man" (YouTube video) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qu-18cP4164&mode=related&search=

Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach photo

„In misfortune we usually regain the peace that we were robbed of through fear of that very misfortune.“

—  Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach Austrian writer 1830 - 1916

Im Unglück finden wir meistens die Ruhe wieder, die uns durch die Furcht vor dem Unglück geraubt wurde.
Fonte: Aphorisms (1880/1893), p. 66.

Georg Christoph Lichtenberg photo
Thomas Gray photo

„From toil he wins his spirits light,
From busy day the peaceful night;
Rich, from the very want of wealth,
In heaven's best treasures, peace and health.“

—  Thomas Gray English poet, historian 1716 - 1771

Fonte: Ode on the Pleasure Arising from Vicissitude http://www.thomasgray.org/cgi-bin/display.cgi?text=oopv (1754), Line 93

Elizabeth Gaskell photo
Stephen Vincent Benét photo

„This is he.
This is the man they ate at the green table
Putting their gloves on ere they touched the meat.
This is the fruit of war, the fruit of peace,
The ripeness of invention, the new lamb,
The answer to the wisdom of the wise.
And still he hangs, and still he will not die
And still, on the steel city of our years
The light falls and the terrible blood streams down.“

—  Stephen Vincent Benét poet, short story writer, novelist 1898 - 1943

Litany for Dictatorships (1935)
Contexto: For the man crucified on the crossed machine guns
Without name, without resurrection, without stars,
His dark head heavy with death and his flesh long sour
With the smell of his many prisons — John Smith, John Doe,
John Nobody — oh, crack your mind for his name!
Faceless as water, naked as the dust,
Dishonored as the earth the gas-shells poison
And barbarous with portent.
This is he.
This is the man they ate at the green table
Putting their gloves on ere they touched the meat.
This is the fruit of war, the fruit of peace,
The ripeness of invention, the new lamb,
The answer to the wisdom of the wise.
And still he hangs, and still he will not die
And still, on the steel city of our years
The light falls and the terrible blood streams down.

Henry Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston photo

„But he came not here a bigoted polemic, with religious tracts in one hand, and civil persecution in the other; he came to regenerate and avenge the prostrate and insulted liberties of England; he came with peace and toleration on his lips, and with civil and religious liberty in his heart.“

—  Henry Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston British politician 1784 - 1865

Speech in the House of Commons (18 March 1829) in favour of Catholic Emancipation, quoted in George Henry Francis, Opinions and Policy of the Right Honourable Viscount Palmerston, G.C.B., M.P., &c. as Minister, Diplomatist, and Statesman, During More Than Forty Years of Public Life (London: Colburn and Co., 1852), pp. 84-85.
1820s
Contexto: I reverence, as much as any one can do, the memory of those great men who effected the Revolution of 1688, and who rescued themselves and us from the thraldom of religious intolerance, and the tyranny of arbitrary power; but I think we are not rendering an appropriate homage to them, when we practice that very intolerance which they successfully resisted, and when we withhold from our fellow-subjects the blessings of that Constitution, which they established with so much courage and wisdom.... that great religious radical, King William... intended to raise a goodly fabric of charity, of concord, and of peace, and upon which his admirers of the present day are endeavouring to build the dungeon of their Protestant Constitution. If the views and intentions of King William had been such as are now imputed to him, instead of blessing his arrival as an epoch of glory and happiness to England, we should have had reason to curse the hour when first he printed his footstep on our strand. But he came not here a bigoted polemic, with religious tracts in one hand, and civil persecution in the other; he came to regenerate and avenge the prostrate and insulted liberties of England; he came with peace and toleration on his lips, and with civil and religious liberty in his heart.

Richard Evelyn Byrd photo

„No woman has ever stepped on Little America — and we have found it to be the most silent and peaceful place in the world.“

—  Richard Evelyn Byrd Medal of Honor recipient and United States Navy officer 1888 - 1957

As quoted in The Oakland Tribune (26 November 1955)

Horace photo

„In peace, as a wise man, he should make suitable preparation for war.“

—  Horace, livro Satires

Book II, satire ii, line 111
Satires (c. 35 BC and 30 BC)
Original: (la) in pace, ut sapiens, aptarit idonea bello

Lucy Parsons photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“