„Let us be elegant or die!“

—  Louisa May Alcott, livro Little Women, Little Women
Louisa May Alcott photo
Louisa May Alcott12
1832 - 1888

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„To-morrow let us do or die.“

—  Thomas Campbell British writer 1777 - 1844
Gertrude of Wyoming (1809), Part III, stanza 37

Marcus Annaeus Seneca photo

„Let us live – we must die.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Seneca Roman scholar -54 - 39 a.C.
Controversiae, Vivamus, moriendum est. Book II, Chapter VI; translation from Michael Winterbottom, Declamations of the Elder Seneca (London: Heinemann, 1974) vol. 1 p. 349 Note: Some editions of Seneca prefer the reading Bibamus, moriendum est (Let us drink – we must die).

Hollow Horn Bear photo

„The bullets bursted [sic] at the time of the war, and we used to die with bullets, but now let us die quietly.“

—  Hollow Horn Bear 19th century Lakota chief and policeman 1850 - 1913
During negotiations with Crook and others, in [Books on Google Play Congressional Serial Set, 1890, U.S. Government Printing Office, https://books.google.com/books?id=lQ0ZAAAAYAAJ, 1 March 2018, 59]

Louisa May Alcott photo
Théodore Guérin photo
Kent Hovind photo

„Yes, God may let us die, but He knows what He is doing! He will GREATLY reward those willing to die for Him.“

—  Kent Hovind American young Earth creationist 1953
What On Earth Is About To Happen… For Heaven’s Sake? (2013), p. 223

Claude McKay photo
Stanislaw Ulam photo

„It is not so much whether a theorem is useful that matters, but how elegant it is.“

—  Stanislaw Ulam Polish-American mathematician 1909 - 1984
Adventures of a Mathematician - Third Edition (1991), Chapter 15, Random Reflections on Mathematics and Science, p. 274

Charles Bukowski photo
Mary Zimmerman photo
Théodore Guérin photo

„Let us never forget that if we wish to die like the Saints we must live like them.“

—  Théodore Guérin Catholic saint and nun from France 1798 - 1856
Context: Let us never forget that if we wish to die like the Saints we must live like them. Let us force ourselves to imitate their virtues, in particular humility and charity. Letter to Sisters at Saint Mary's, 1848.

John Manners, 7th Duke of Rutland photo

„Let wealth and commerce, laws and learning die,
But leave us still our old nobility.“

—  John Manners, 7th Duke of Rutland British politician 1818 - 1906
Context: No: by the names inscribed in History's page, Names that are England's noblest heritage, Names that shall live for yet unnumbered years Shrined in our hearts with Cressy and Poictiers; Let wealth and commerce, laws and learning die, But leave us still our old nobility. England's Trust, part iii, line 227, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).

Norman Cousins photo
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William Kingdon Clifford photo

„Do I seem to say, "Let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die?" Far from it; on the contrary, I say, "Let us take hands and help, for this day we are alive together."“

—  William Kingdon Clifford English mathematician and philosopher 1845 - 1879
Context: It is a very serious thing to consider that not only the earth itself and all that beautiful face of Nature we see, but also the living things upon it, and all the consciousness of men, and the ideas of society, which have grown up upon the surface, must come to an end. We who hold that belief must just face the fact and make the best of it; and I think we are helped in this by the words of that Jew philosopher who was himself a worthy crown to the splendid achievements of his race in the cause of progress during the middle ages, Benedict Spinoza. He said, "The freeman thinks of nothing so little as of death, and his contemplation is not of death but of life." Our interest, it seems to me, lies with so much of the past as may serve to guide our actions in the present, and to intensify our pious allegiance to the fathers who have gone before us, and the brethren who are with us; and our interest lies with so much of the future as we may hope will be appreciably affected by our good actions now. Beyond that, as it seems to me, we do not know, and we ought not to care. Do I seem to say, "Let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die?" Far from it; on the contrary, I say, "Let us take hands and help, for this day we are alive together." "The First and the Last Catastrophe" in Popular Science Monthly (Vol. 7, (July 1875)

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