„Death in anonymity is the ultimate insult to human dignity.“

—  Kathy Reichs, livro Break No Bones
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Yukio Mishima photo

„But there is no meaning, no dignity, no fulfillment, in the death of a child.“

—  Walter M. Miller, Jr. American fiction writer 1923 - 1996
Context: There is a difference between tragedy and blind brutal calamity. Tragedy has meaning, and there is dignity in it. Tragedy stands with its shoulders stiff and proud. But there is no meaning, no dignity, no fulfillment, in the death of a child. "The Will" (1953)

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Orson Scott Card photo

„That is the ultimate power, to stare death in the face and be unafraid.“

—  Orson Scott Card American science fiction novelist 1951
The Tales of Alvin Maker, The Crystal City (2003), Chapter 11 “Flood” (p. 214).

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„The concentration camps, by making death itself anonymous (making it impossible to find out whether a prisoner is dead or alive), robbed death of its meaning as the end of a fulfilled life.“

—  Hannah Arendt, livro As Origens do Totalitarismo
The Origins of Totalitarianism (1951), Context: The concentration camps, by making death itself anonymous (making it impossible to find out whether a prisoner is dead or alive), robbed death of its meaning as the end of a fulfilled life. In a sense they took away the individual’s own death, proving that henceforth nothing belonged to him and he belonged to no one. His death merely set a seal on the fact that he had never existed. Part 3, Ch. 12, § 3.

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„"Well, wouldn't that be the ultimate cure?" Aira concluded cheerfully. "The cure for death?"“

—  Vanna Bonta, livro Flight: A Quantum Fiction Novel
Flight: A Quantum Fiction Novel (1995), Ch. 32

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W.B. Yeats photo

„Crying amid the glittering sea,
Naming it with the ecstatic breath,
Because it had such dignity,
By the sweet name of Death.“

—  W.B. Yeats Irish poet and playwright 1865 - 1939
The Green Helmet and Other Poems (1910), Context: I swayed upon the gaudy stern The butt-end of a steering-oar, And saw wherever I could turn A crowd upon a shore. And though I would have hushed the crowd, There was no mother's son but said, 'What is the figure in a shroud Upon a gaudy bed?' And after running at the brim Cried out upon that thing beneath --It had such dignity of a limb-- By the sweet name of Death. Though I'd my finger on my lip, What could I but take up the song? And running crowd and gaudy ship Cried out the whole night long, Crying amid the glittering sea, Naming it with the ecstatic breath, Because it had such dignity, By the sweet name of Death. His Dream http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1509/

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„Far more real than the ticking of time is the way we open up the minutes and invest them with meaning. Death is not the ultimate tragedy in life. The ultimate tragedy is to die without discovering the possibilities of full growth.“

—  Norman Cousins American journalist 1915 - 1990
Context: Hope, faith, love and a strong will to live offer no promise of immortality, only proof of our uniqueness ans human beings and the opportunity to experience full growth even under the grimmest circumstances. Far more real than the ticking of time is the way we open up the minutes and invest them with meaning. Death is not the ultimate tragedy in life. The ultimate tragedy is to die without discovering the possibilities of full growth. Quoted in Good Housekeeping (November 1989), p. 92.

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