„Do not be concerned with the faults of other persons. Do not see others' faults with a hateful mind. There is an old saying that if you stop seeing others' faults, then naturally seniors and venerated and juniors are revered. Do not imitate others' faults; just cultivate virtue. Buddha prohibited unwholesome actions, but did not tell us to hate those who practice unwholesome actions.“

Eihei Dogen photo
Eihei Dogen
1200 - 1253
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„Teach me to feel another's woe,
To right the fault I see;
That mercy I to others show,
That mercy show to me.“

— Alexander Pope eighteenth century English poet 1688 - 1744
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— Meher Baba Indian mystic 1894 - 1969
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„It is in our faults and failings, not in our virtues, that we touch each other, and find sympathy. It is in our follies that we are one.“

— Jerome K. Jerome, Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow
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„Other people’s faults can be fascinating. One’s own are dreary.“

— Mervyn Peake English writer, artist, poet and illustrator 1911 - 1968
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