„My hate is general, I detest all men;
Some because they are wicked and do evil,
Others because they tolerate the wicked,
Refusing them the active vigorous scorn
Which vice should stimulate in virtuous minds.“

—  Molière, The Misanthrope

Fonte: The Misanthrope

Molière photo
Molière9
1622 - 1673

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Charles Baudelaire photo

„To be wicked is never excusable, but there is some merit in knowing that you are; the most irreparable of vices is to do evil from stupidity.“

—  Charles Baudelaire, livro Le Spleen de Paris

On n'est jamais excusable d'être méchant, mais il y a quelque mérite à savoir qu'on l'est; et le plus irréparable des vices est de faire le mal par bêtise.
XXVIII: "La Fausse Monnaie"
Le Spleen de Paris (1862)

Horace Mann photo
Diogenes Laërtius photo

„When he was praised by some wicked men, he said, "I am sadly afraid that I must have done some wicked thing."“

—  Diogenes Laërtius biographer of ancient Greek philosophers 180 - 240

Antisthenes, 4.
The Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers (c. 200 A.D.), Book 6: The Cynics

Antisthenes photo

„It is better to fight with a few good men against all the wicked, than with many wicked men against a few good men.“

—  Antisthenes Greek philosopher -444 - -365 a.C.

§ 5
From Lives and Opinions of the Eminent Philosophers by Diogenes Laërtius
Original: (el) κρεῖττόν ἐστι μετ᾿ ὀλίγων ἀγαθῶν πρὸς ἅπαντας τοὺς κακοὺς ἢ μετὰ πολλῶν κακῶν πρὸς ὀλίγους ἀγαθοὺς μάχεσθαι.

Denis Diderot photo
Emil M. Cioran photo
Bias of Priene photo

„Most men are wicked.“

—  Bias of Priene ancient Greek philosopher, one of the Seven Sages -600 - -530 a.C.

The Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers (c. 230)

Giacomo Leopardi photo
Jonathan Swift photo

„I never wonder to see men wicked, but I often wonder to see them not ashamed.“

—  Jonathan Swift Anglo-Irish satirist, essayist, and poet 1667 - 1745

Thoughts on Various Subjects from Miscellanies (1711-1726)

Halldór Laxness photo
Ray Comfort photo

„I do admit to mocking atheists, because mockery is a legitimate form of debate according to my rule Book. God Himself mocks evil men who refuse His moral government“

—  Ray Comfort New Zealand-born Christian minister and evangelist 1949

see Proverbs 1:26-27
[Nothing Created Everything: The Scientific Impossibility of Atheistic Evolution, 2009-09-22, WorldNetDaily, Los Angeles, 9781935071235, 2009931567, 90, http://books.google.com/books?id=1wqMdLiV970C&pg=PA90]
edit of statement in * Cruelty and hatred
Atheist Central
2009-04-27
http://raycomfortfood.blogspot.com/2009/04/cruelty-and-hatred.html
2011-10-21

Posidonius photo

„Riches are a cause of evil, not because, of themselves, they do any evil, but because they goad men on so that they are ready to do evil.“

—  Posidonius ancient greek philosopher -135 - -51 a.C.

As quoted in Epistulae morales ad Lucilium by Seneca, Epistle LXXXVII (trans. R. M. Gummere)

E. W. Howe photo

„Men are virtuous because the women are; women are virtuous from necessity.“

—  E. W. Howe, livro The Story of a Country Town

The Story of a Country Town, Chapter 30 http://books.google.com/books?id=rbwEAQAAIAAJ&q=%22Men+are+virtuous+because+the+women+are+women%22+%22virtuous+from+necessity%22&pg=PA353#v=onepage (1883).

Maimónides photo
Frederick William Robertson photo
George Washington photo

„The General is sorry to be informed —, that the foolish and wicked practice of profane cursing and swearing, a vice heretofore little known in an American army, is growing into a fashion; — he hopes the officers will, by example as well as influence, endeavor to check it, and that both they and the men will reflect that we can have little hope of the blessing of Heaven on our arms, if we insult it by impiety and folly; added to this, it is a vice so mean and low, without any temptation, that every man of sense and character detests and despises it.“

—  George Washington first President of the United States 1732 - 1799

Extract from the Orderly Book of the army under command of Washington, dated at Head Quarters, in the city of New York (3 August 1770); reported in American Masonic Register and Literary Companion, Volume 1 https://www.thefederalistpapers.org/founders/washington/george-washington-the-foolish-and-wicked-practice-of-profane-cursing-and-swearing (1829), p. 163
1770s

Benjamin Franklin photo

„If Men are so wicked as we now see them with Religion what would they be if without it?“

—  Benjamin Franklin American author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, inventor, civic activist, statesman, a… 1706 - 1790

Letter to unknown recipient (13 December 1757) http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/index.asp?document=473. The letter was published as early as 1817 (William Temple Franklin, The Works of Benjamin Franklin, volume VI, pp. 243-244). In 1833 William Wisner ("Don't Unchain the Tiger," American Tract Society, 1833) identified the recipient as probably Thomas Paine, which was echoed by Jared Sparks in his 1840 edition of Franklin's works (volume x, p. 281). (Presumably it would have been directed against The Age of Reason, his deistic work which criticized orthodox Christianity.) Calvin Blanchard responded to Wisner's tract in The Life of Thomas Paine (1860), pp. 73-74, by noting that Franklin died in 1790, while Paine did not begin writing The Age of Reason until 1793, and incorrectly concluded that the letter did not exist. Paul F. Boller, Jr., and John George, included it in They Never Said It: A Book of Fake Quotes, Misquotes, & Misleading Attributions (1989), on p. 28. Moncure Daniel Conway pointed out (The Life of Thomas Paine, 1892, vol I, p. vii) that the recipient could not be Thomas Paine, in that he, unlike Paine, denied a "particular providence". The intended recipient remains unidentified.
Parts of the above have also been rearranged and paraphrased:
I would advise you not to attempt Unchaining The Tiger, but to burn this piece before it is seen by any other person.
If men are so wicked with religion, what would they be if without it?
If men are so wicked with religion, what would they be Without it? Think how many inconsiderate and inexperienced youth of both sexes there are, who have need of the motives of religion to restrain them from vice, to support their virtue, and retain them in the practice of it till it becomes habitual.
Epistles
Contexto: I have read your Manuscript with some Attention. By the Arguments it contains against the Doctrine of a particular Providence, tho’ you allow a general Providence, you strike at the Foundation of all Religion: For without the Belief of a Providence that takes Cognizance of, guards and guides and may favour particular Persons, there is no Motive to Worship a Deity, to fear its Displeasure, or to pray for its Protection. I will not enter into any Discussion of your Principles, tho’ you seem to desire it; At present I shall only give you my Opinion that tho’ your Reasonings are subtle, and may prevail with some Readers, you will not succeed so as to change the general Sentiments of Mankind on that Subject, and the Consequence of printing this Piece will be a great deal of Odium drawn upon your self, Mischief to you and no Benefit to others. He that spits against the Wind, spits in his own Face. But were you to succeed, do you imagine any Good would be done by it? You yourself may find it easy to live a virtuous Life without the Assistance afforded by Religion; you having a clear Perception of the Advantages of Virtue and the Disadvantages of Vice, and possessing a Strength of Resolution sufficient to enable you to resist common Temptations. But think how great a Proportion of Mankind consists of weak and ignorant Men and Women, and of inexperienc’d and inconsiderate Youth of both Sexes, who have need of the Motives of Religion to restrain them from Vice, to support their Virtue, and retain them in the Practice of it till it becomes habitual, which is the great Point for its Security; And perhaps you are indebted to her originally that is to your Religious Education, for the Habits of Virtue upon which you now justly value yourself. You might easily display your excellent Talents of reasoning on a less hazardous Subject, and thereby obtain Rank with our most distinguish’d Authors. For among us, it is not necessary, as among the Hottentots that a Youth to be receiv’d into the Company of Men, should prove his Manhood by beating his Mother. I would advise you therefore not to attempt unchaining the Tyger, but to burn this Piece before it is seen by any other Person, whereby you will save yourself a great deal of Mortification from the Enemies it may raise against you, and perhaps a good deal of Regret and Repentance. If Men are so wicked as we now see them with Religion what would they be if without it?

Arthur Schopenhauer photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“