„The fog is clearing; life is a matter of taste.“

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Frank Wedekind
1864 - 1918
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„It is not the clear-sighted who lead the world. Great achievements are accomplished in a blessed, warm mental fog.“

—  Joseph Conrad Polish-British writer 1857 - 1924
Victory: An Island Tale http://www.gutenberg.org/files/6378/6378-h/6378-h.htm (1915), Part II, ch. 3

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„There is no unique, correct answer in most cases. It is a matter of taste“

—  Richard Hamming American mathematician and information theorist 1915 - 1998
Context: There is no unique, correct answer in most cases. It is a matter of taste, depending on the circumstances... and the particular age you live in.... Gradually, you will develop your own taste, and along the way you may occasionally recognize that your taste may be the best one! It is the same as an art course.

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„All problems are resolved and everything is clear. The rock, all matter, all life, is charged with dharmakaya… everything is emptiness and everything is compassion.“

—  Thomas Merton Priest and author 1915 - 1968
Context: Looking at these figures I was suddenly, almost forcibly, jerked clean out of the habitual, half-tied vision of things, and an inner clearness, clarity, as if exploding from the rocks themselves, became evident and obvious. … The thing about this is that there is no puzzle, no problem, and really no "mystery." All problems are resolved and everything is clear. The rock, all matter, all life, is charged with dharmakaya… everything is emptiness and everything is compassion. I don’t know when in my life I have ever had such a sense of beauty and spiritual validity running together in one aesthetic illumination. Surely with Mahabalipuram and Polonnaruwa my Asian pilgrimage has come clear and purified itself. I mean, I know and have seen what I was obscurely looking for. I don’t know what else remains but I have now seen and have pierced through the surface and have got beyond the shadow and the disguise. The whole thing is very much a Zen garden, a span of bareness and openness and evidence, and the great figures, motionless, yet with the lines in full movement, waves of vesture and bodily form, a beautiful and holy vision. The Asian Journal of Thomas Merton (1975) Part One : Ceylon / November 29 - December 6.

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„... shall we say that the difference between a vegetarian and a cannibal is just a matter of taste?“

—  Leszek Kolakowski Philosopher, historian of ideas 1927 - 2009
"The Idolatry of Politics", New Republic, 1986-June-16, page 31.

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„I tasted life.“

—  Emily Dickinson American poet 1830 - 1886

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„The strenuous life tastes better“

—  William James American philosopher, psychologist, and pragmatist 1842 - 1910

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„All men are stuck in a kind of fog. They're surrounded by a wall of fog. They think this is perfectly normal, but it's not.“

—  Colin Wilson author 1931 - 2013
Context: All men are stuck in a kind of fog. They're surrounded by a wall of fog. They think this is perfectly normal, but it's not. It means that since they can't see much beyond their own little situation, they tend to vegetate. They need some immediate stimulus to keep them alert. p. 20

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„We write to taste life twice, in the moment and in retrospect.“

—  Anaïs Nin writer of novels, short stories, and erotica 1903 - 1977
Context: We write to taste life twice, in the moment, and in retrospection. We write, like Proust, to render all of it eternal, and to persuade ourselves that it is eternal. We write to be able to transcend our life, to reach beyond it. Context: The artist is the only one who knows that the world is a subjective creation, that there is a choice to be made, a selection of elements. It is a materialization, an incarnation of his inner world. Then he hopes to attract others into it. He hopes to impose his particular vision and share it with others. And when the second stage is not reached, the brave artist continues nevertheless. The few moments of communion with the world are worth the pain, for it is a world for others, an inheritance for others, a gift to others, in the end. When you make a world tolerable for yourself, you make a world tolerable for others. We also write to heighten our own awareness of life. We write to lure and enchant and console others. We write to serenade our lovers. We write to taste life twice, in the moment, and in retrospection. We write, like Proust, to render all of it eternal, and to persuade ourselves that it is eternal. We write to be able to transcend our life, to reach beyond it. We write to teach ourselves to speak with others, to record the journey into the labyrinth. We write to expand our world when we feel strangled, or constricted, or lonely. We write as the birds sing, as the primitives dance their rituals. If you do not breathe through writing, if you do not cry out in writing, or sing in writing, then don't write, because our culture has no use for it. When I don't write, I feel my world shrinking. I feel I am in a prison. I feel I lose my fire and my color. It should be a necessity, as the sea needs to heave, and I call it breathing. February 1954 The Diary of Anaïs Nin, Vol. 5 as quoted in Woman as Writer (1978) by Jeannette L. Webber and Joan Grumman, p. 38

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