„Action springs not from thought, but from a readiness for responsibility.“

— Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Dietrich Bonhoeffer photo
Dietrich Bonhoeffer11
1906 - 1945
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„One ever feels his twoness, -- an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose strenth alone keeps it from being torn asunder.“

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