„All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others.“

Douglas Adams photo
Douglas Adams19
escritor e comediante britânico 1952 - 2001
Publicidade

Citações relacionadas

George Orwell photo
Publicidade
George Orwell photo
Charles Sanders Peirce photo

„They probably share those current notions of logic which recognise no other Arguments than Argumentations.“

— Charles Sanders Peirce American philosopher, logician, mathematician, and scientist 1839 - 1914
Context: An "Argument" is any process of thought reasonably tending to produce a definite belief. An "Argumentation" is an Argument proceeding upon definitely formulated premisses. If God Really be, and be benign, then, in view of the generally conceded truth that religion, were it but proved, would be a good outweighing all others, we should naturally expect that there would be some Argument for His Reality that should be obvious to all minds, high and low alike, that should earnestly strive to find the truth of the matter; and further, that this Argument should present its conclusion, not as a proposition of metaphysical theology, but in a form directly applicable to the conduct of life, and full of nutrition for man's highest growth. What I shall refer to as the N. A. — the Neglected Argument — seems to me best to fulfil this condition, and I should not wonder if the majority of those whose own reflections have harvested belief in God must bless the radiance of the N. A. for that wealth. Its persuasiveness is no less than extraordinary; while it is not unknown to anybody. Nevertheless, of all those theologians (within my little range of reading) who, with commendable assiduity, scrape together all the sound reasons they can find or concoct to prove the first proposition of theology, few mention this one, and they most briefly. They probably share those current notions of logic which recognise no other Arguments than Argumentations.

Northrop Frye photo
Richard Feynman photo

„A very great deal more truth can become known than can be proven.“

— Richard Feynman American theoretical physicist 1918 - 1988
"The Development of the Space-Time View of Quantum Electrodynamics," Nobel Lecture http://nobelprize.org/physics/laureates/1965/feynman-lecture.html (11 December 1965)

Ellen G. White photo

„I wish that we had much more of the Spirit of Christ and a great deal less self, and less of human opinions. If we err, let it be on the side of mercy rather than on the side of condemnation and harsh dealing“

— Ellen G. White American author and founder/leader of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church 1827 - 1915
Letter 16, 1887, also in Testimonies on Sexual Behavior, Adultery, and Divorce (1989) http://egwdatabase.whiteestate.org/nxt/gateway.dll/egw-comp/section00000.htm/book05997.htm/chapter06009.htm, p. 242

Publicidade
Ted Hughes photo

„Many writers write a great deal, but very few write more than a very little of the real thing. So most writing must be displaced activity.“

— Ted Hughes English poet and children's writer 1930 - 1998
Context: Many writers write a great deal, but very few write more than a very little of the real thing. So most writing must be displaced activity. When cockerels confront each other and daren’t fight, they busily start pecking imaginary grains off to the side. That’s displaced activity. Much of what we do at any level is a bit like that, I fancy. But hard to know which is which. On the other hand, the machinery has to be kept running. The big problem for those who write verse is keeping the machine running without simply exercising evasion of the real confrontation. If Ulanova, the ballerina, missed one day of practice, she couldn’t get back to peak fitness without a week of hard work. Dickens said the same about his writing—if he missed a day he needed a week of hard slog to get back into the flow.

„I am the logic of all arguments - Arguments are of three kinds:“

— Baba Hari Dass master yogi, author, builder, commentator of Indian spiritual tradition 1923
1) jalpa (arrogant argument) – In this type of argument one tries to establish one's point of view by contradicting the opponent's argument without considering whether the opponent's argument is right or wrong. 2) vitanda (destructive criticism) – In this type of argument the person simply destroys the opponent's viewpoint by misleading argument. 3) vada (logical argument) – In this type of argument one uses a method of discussion with reasoning with an aim to find out what is truth and what is untruth. Reasoning is the best method of discussion to achieve the truth. This is why the Lord says, “Among arguments, I am vada or logical argument.”

Jean de La Bruyère photo

„The true spirit of conversation consists more in bringing out the cleverness of others than in showing a great deal of it yourself“

— Jean de La Bruyère 17th-century French writer and philosopher 1645 - 1696
Context: The true spirit of conversation consists more in bringing out the cleverness of others than in showing a great deal of it yourself; he who goes away pleased with himself and his own wit is also greatly pleased with you. Most men would rather please than admire you; they seek less to be instructed, and even to be amused, than to be praised and applauded. 16

Publicidade
Abraham Lincoln photo
Jean de La Bruyère photo

„Liberality consists less in giving a great deal than in gifts well timed.“

— Jean de La Bruyère 17th-century French writer and philosopher 1645 - 1696
Aphorism 47; Variant translation: Generosity lies less in giving much than in giving at the right moment.

Roger Penrose photo

„Understanding is, after all, what science is all about — and science is a great deal more than mindless computation.“

— Roger Penrose English mathematical physicist, recreational mathematician and philosopher 1931
As quoted in The Golden Ratio : The Story of Phi, the World's Most Astonishing Number (2002) by Mario Livio, p. 201.

Clement Attlee photo

„The Common Market. The so-called Common Market of six nations. Know them all well. Very recently this country spent a great deal of blood and treasure rescuing four of 'em from attacks by the other two.“

— Clement Attlee Former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom 1883 - 1967
Peter Hennessy, The Prime Minister: The Office and its Holders since 1945 (Penguin, 2001), p. 173. Attlee's speech to a group of anti-Common Market Labour backbench MPs in 1967, as recalled by Douglas Jay to Peter Hennessy in 1983. This was Attlee's last ever speech.

Próximo