„History had a slow pulse; man counted in years, history in generations“

—  Arthur Koestler, livro Darkness at Noon
Arthur Koestler photo
Arthur Koestler6
1905 - 1983

Citações relacionadas

Gustavo Gutiérrez photo

„Human history is in truth nothing but the history of the slow, uncertain, and surprising fulfillment of the Promise.“

—  Gustavo Gutiérrez Peruvian theologian 1928
A Theology of Liberation - 15th Anniversary Edition, Chapter Nine, Liberation And Salvation, p. 91-92

Norman Mailer photo
Sydney Smith photo

„The history of the world shows us that men are not to be counted by their numbers, but by the fire and vigour of their passions“

—  Sydney Smith English writer and clergyman 1771 - 1845
Elementary Sketches of Moral Philosophy (1849), Context: The history of the world shows us that men are not to be counted by their numbers, but by the fire and vigour of their passions; by their deep sense of injury; by their memory of past glory; by their eagerness for fresh fame; by their clear and steady resolution of ceasing to live, or of achieving a particular object, which, when it is once formed, strikes off a load of manacles and chains, and gives free space to all heavenly and heroic feelings. All great and extraordinary actions come from the heart. There are seasons in human affairs, when qualities fit enough to conduct the common business of life, are feeble and useless; and when men must trust to emotion, for that safety which reason at such times can never give. These are the feelings which led the ten thousand over the Carduchian mountans; these are the feelings by which a handful of Greeks broke in pieces the power of Persia: they have, by turns, humbled Austria, reduced Spain; and in the fens of the Dutch, and on the mountains of the Swiss, defended the happiness, and revenged the oppressions, of man! God calls all the passions out in their keenness and vigour, for the present safety of mankind. Anger, and revenge, and the heroic mind, and a readiness to suffer;— all the secret strength, all the invisible array, of the feelings,— all that nature has reserved for the great scenes of the world. For the usual hopes, and the common aids of man, are all gone! Kings have perished, armies are subdued, nations mouldered away! Nothing remains, under God, but those passions which have often proved the best ministers of His vengeance, and the surest protectors of the world. Lecture XXVIL: On Habit - Part II, in “Elementary Sketches of Moral Philosophy”, delivered at The Royal Institution in the years 1804, 1805, and 1806 by the late Rev. Sydney Smith, M.A. (Spottiswoodes and Shaw (London: 1849)) http://www.archive.org/stream/elementarysketc03smitgoog#page/n438/mode/2up, p. 423-424 Another Variant: The history of the world shows us that men are not to be counted by their numbers, but by the fire and vigour of their passions; by their deep sense of injury; by their memory of past glory; by their eagerness for fresh fame; by their clear and steady resolution of ceasing to live, or of achieving a particular object, which, when it is once formed, strikes off a load of manacles and chains, and gives free space to all heavenly and heroic feelings. All great and extraordinary actions come from the heart. There are seasons in human affairs when qualities, fit enough to conduct the common business of life, are feeble and useless, when men must trust to emotion for that safety which reason at such times can never give. These are the feelings which led the ten thousand over the Carduchian mountains; these are the feelings by which a handful of Greeks broke in pieces the power of Persia; and in the fens of the Dutch, and on the mountains of the Swiss, defended the happiness and revenged the oppressions of man! God calls all the passions out in their keenness and vigour for the present safety of mankind, anger and revenge, and the heroic mind, and a readiness to suffer—all the secret strength, all the invisible array of the feelings—all that nature has reserved for the great scenes of the world. When the usual hopes and the common aids of man are all gone, nothing remains under God but those passions which have often proved the best ministers of His purpose and the surest protectors of the world. Quoted by Theodore Roosevelt in his " Brotherhood and the Heroic Virtues http://www.theodore-roosevelt.com/images/research/txtspeeches/668.pdf" Address at the Veterans' Reunion, Burlington, Vermont, September 5, 1901 and published in Theodore Roosevelt's "The Strenuous Life: Essays and Addresses" by Dover Publications (April 23, 2009) in its Dover Thrift Editions (ISBN: 978-0486472294), p. 126-127

E.L. Doctorow photo
Robert A. Heinlein photo
Timothy Leary photo

„We are dealing with the best-educated generation in history.“

—  Timothy Leary American psychologist 1920 - 1996
Context: We are dealing with the best-educated generation in history. They are a hundred times better educated than their grandparents, and ten times more sophisticated. There has never been such an open-minded group. The problem is that no one is giving them anything fresh. They've got a brain dressed up with nowhere to go. Interview by David Sheff in Rolling Stone Twentieth Anniversary Issue (1987)

John F. Kennedy photo

„We must deal with the world as it is, and not as it might have been had the history of the last 18 years been different.“

—  John F. Kennedy 35th president of the United States of America 1917 - 1963
1963, American University speech, Context: Let us reexamine our attitude toward the cold war, remembering that we are not engaged in a debate, seeking to pile up debating points. We are not here distributing blame or pointing the finger of judgment. We must deal with the world as it is, and not as it might have been had the history of the last 18 years been different. We must, therefore, persevere in the search for peace in the hope that constructive changes within the Communist bloc might bring within reach solutions which now seem beyond us. We must conduct our affairs in such a way that it becomes in the Communists' interest to agree on a genuine peace. Above all, while defending our own vital interests, nuclear powers must avert those confrontations which bring an adversary to a choice of either a humiliating retreat or a nuclear war. To adopt that kind of course in the nuclear age would be evidence only of the bankruptcy of our policy — or of a collective death-wish for the world. To secure these ends, America's weapons are nonprovocative, carefully controlled, designed to deter, and capable of selective use. Our military forces are committed to peace and disciplined in self- restraint. Our diplomats are instructed to avoid unnecessary irritants and purely rhetorical hostility. For we can seek a relaxation of tension without relaxing our guard. And, for our part, we do not need to use threats to prove that we are resolute. We do not need to jam foreign broadcasts out of fear our faith will be eroded. We are unwilling to impose our system on any unwilling people — but we are willing and able to engage in peaceful competition with any people on earth.

Edwin Boring photo
Bob Marley photo

„Two thousand years of history Black History could not be wiped away so easily.“

—  Bob Marley Jamaican singer, songwriter, musician 1945 - 1981
Uprising (1979), Zion Train

Harper Lee photo
Valerio Massimo Manfredi photo
Glenn Beck photo

„The hottest year in global [sic] history was 1934.“

—  Glenn Beck U.S. talk radio and television host 1964
2000s, Countdown with Keith Olbermann 2007-10-26 http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21528675/ 2007-10-26 after NASA revealed an error in their U.S. (not global) temperature calculations; before the correction, the hottest year in U.S. history was said to be 1998

Robert Anton Wilson photo
Theodore Roosevelt photo
Isaac Asimov photo

„Throughout the history of Christianity, there had been a core of belief that man was not doomed to be everlastingly corrupt.“

—  Pierre Stephen Robert Payne British lecturer, novelist, historian, poet and biographer 1911 - 1983
The Corrupt Society - From Ancient Greece To Present-Day America (1975), The Romantic Agony, p. 158

Napoleon I of France photo

„If I had succeeded, I would have been the greatest man known to history.“

—  Napoleon I of France French general, First Consul and later Emperor of the French 1769 - 1821
Attributed, As quoted in The Tyrants : 2500 Years of Absolute Power and Corruption (2006) by Clive Foss ISBN 1905204965

„Man's history is the story of his wanderings“

—  Eugene M. Kulischer American sociologist 1881 - 1956
Europe on the Move: War and Population Changes, 1917-1947, 1948, Context: Man's history is the story of his wanderings. Some epochs of the remote past have frequently been called 'periods of great migrations.' This terminology presumes that at other times migratory movements were at a standstill, especially in the case of a so-called 'sedentary' people. Every epoch is a period of "great migrations". p. 8 as cited in: Susanne Schätzle (2004) Migration und Integration in Deutschland. p. 10

Len Deighton photo

„Progress is man’s indifference to the lessons of history.“

—  Len Deighton, livro An Expensive Place to Die
An Expensive Place to Die, Jonathan Cape (1967) Ch. 39

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

x