Citações Theodore Roethke

„I knew a woman, lovely in her bones“

—  Theodore Roethke
Words for the Wind (1958), Context: I knew a woman, lovely in her bones, When small birds sighed, she would sigh back at them; Ah, when she moved, she moved more ways than one: The shapes a bright container can contain! "I Knew a Woman," ll. 1 - 4

„The small become the great, the great the small;
The right thing happens to the happy man.“

—  Theodore Roethke
The Far Field (1964), Context: God bless the roots! — Body and soul are one! The small become the great, the great the small; The right thing happens to the happy man. "The Right Thing," ll. 7-9

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„I know the motion of the deepest stone.
Each one's himself, yet each one's everyone.“

—  Theodore Roethke
Words for the Wind (1958), Context: p>Is pain a promise? I was schooled in pain, And found out what I could of all desire; I weep for what I'm like when I'm alone In the deep center of the voice and fire.I know the motion of the deepest stone. Each one's himself, yet each one's everyone.</p "The Sententious Man," ll. 31-36

„All lovers live by longing, and endure:
Summon a vision and declare it pure.“

—  Theodore Roethke
The Waking (1953), Context: Dante attained the purgatorial hill, Trembled at hidden virtue without flaw, Shook with a mighty power beyond his will, — Did Beatrice deny what Dante saw? All lovers live by longing, and endure: Summon a vision and declare it pure. "Four for Sir John Davies," ll. 73-78

„At Woodlawn I Heard the dead cry“

—  Theodore Roethke
The Lost Son and Other Poems (1948), Context: At Woodlawn I Heard the dead cry: I was lulled by the slamming of iron, A slow drip over stones, Toads brooding wells. The Lost Son, ll. 1-4

„Is pain a promise? I was schooled in pain“

—  Theodore Roethke
Words for the Wind (1958), Context: p>Is pain a promise? I was schooled in pain, And found out what I could of all desire; I weep for what I'm like when I'm alone In the deep center of the voice and fire.I know the motion of the deepest stone. Each one's himself, yet each one's everyone.</p "The Sententious Man," ll. 31-36

„Over the gulfs of dream
Flew a tremendous bird“

—  Theodore Roethke
The Lost Son and Other Poems (1948), Context: Over the gulfs of dream Flew a tremendous bird Further and further away Into a moonless black, Deep in the brain, far back. "Night Crow," ll. 4-8

„I'll seek my own meekness.
What grace I have is enough.“

—  Theodore Roethke
Praise to the End! (1951), Context: I'll seek my own meekness. What grace I have is enough. The lost have their own pace. The stalks ask something else. What the grave says, The nest denies. "Unfold! Unfold!," ll. 59-64

„Death was not. I lived in a simple drowse:
Hands and hair moved through a dream of wakening blossoms.“

—  Theodore Roethke
The Lost Son and Other Poems (1948), Context: Death was not. I lived in a simple drowse: Hands and hair moved through a dream of wakening blossoms. Rain sweetened the cave and the dove still called; The flowers leaned on themselves, the flowers in hollows; And love, love sang toward. "The Shape of the Fire," ll. 73-77

„To know that light falls and fills, often without our knowing.“

—  Theodore Roethke
The Lost Son and Other Poems (1948), Context: To stare into the after-light, the glitter left on the lake's surface, When the sun has fallen behind a wooded island; To follow the drips sliding from a lifted oar Held up, while the rower breathes, and the small boat drifts quietly shoreward; To know that light falls and fills, often without our knowing. The Shape of the Fire," ll. 88-92

„What's left is light as a seed;
I need an old crone's knowing.“

—  Theodore Roethke
Words for the Wind (1958), Context: How can I rest in the days of my slowness? I've become a strange piece of flesh, Nervous and cold, bird-furtive, whiskery, With a cheek soft as a hound's ear. What's left is light as a seed; I need an old crone's knowing. "Meditations of an Old Woman: First Meditation," ll. 15-21

„I saw the separateness of all things!“

—  Theodore Roethke
The Lost Son and Other Poems (1948), Context: I saw the separateness of all things! My heart lifted up with the great grasses; The weeds believed me, and the nesting birds. "A Field of Light," ll. 45-47

„We are afraid of what our eyes have seen:
For something is amiss or out of place
When mice with wings can wear a human face.“

—  Theodore Roethke
Open House (1941), Context: He loops in crazy figures half the night Among the trees that face the corner light. But when he brushes up against a screen, We are afraid of what our eyes have seen: For something is amiss or out of place When mice with wings can wear a human face. "The Bat," ll. 5-10

„Who stunned the dirt into noise?
Ask the mole, he knows.“

—  Theodore Roethke
The Lost Son and Other Poems (1948), Context: Who stunned the dirt into noise? Ask the mole, he knows. I feel the slime of a wet nest. Beware Mother Mildew. Nibble again, fish nerves. "The Lost Son," ll. 66-70

„My secrets cry aloud.
I have no need for tongue.“

—  Theodore Roethke
Open House (1941), Context: My secrets cry aloud. I have no need for tongue. My heart keeps open house, My doors are widely swung. An epic of the eyes My love, with no disguise. "Open House," ll. 1-6

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