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Paul Tsongas

Data de nascimento: 14. Fevereiro 1941
Data de falecimento: 18. Janeiro 1997

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Paul Efthemios Tsongas was a Greek-American politician. He represented Massachusetts in both houses of the United States Congress, holding office from 1975 to 1985. He won seven states as a candidate in the 1992 Democratic presidential primaries, losing the nomination to Bill Clinton.

Born in Lowell, Massachusetts, Tsongas graduated from Yale Law School and the Kennedy School of Government. After working for the Peace Corps and as an aide to Congressman F. Bradford Morse, Tsongas successively won election as a city councilor and county commissioner. In 1974, he won election to the United States House of Representatives, representing Massachusetts's 5th congressional district. In Massachusetts's 1978 Senate election, he defeated incumbent Republican Senator Edward Brooke. In Congress, Tsongas established a reputation as a social liberal and fiscal conservative.

Tsongas was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 1983 and declined to seek re-election in 1984. He returned to politics after undergoing a successful bone marrow transplant. He experienced early success in the 1992 Democratic presidential primaries, winning the New Hampshire primary, but withdrew from the race in March 1992 and endorsed Clinton. An opponent of deficit spending, Tsongas co-founded the Concord Coalition. He died in 1997 of complications from pneumonia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Citações Paul Tsongas

„You cannot be pro-jobs and anti-business at the same time. You cannot love employment and hate employers.“

— Paul Tsongas
1992 Democratic National Convention. [http://www.nytimes.com/1992/07/16/news/under-big-top-excerpts-remarks-delivered-tsongas-brown-convention.html]

„The cold war is over; Japan won.“

— Paul Tsongas
As quoted in [http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E0CEFDB123BF934A25751C0A964958260&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=all "The 1992 Campaign : Campaign Memo; Voters Want Candidates To Take a Reality Check" by Maureen Dowd in The New York Times (17 February 1992)]